Top Stories

Latham Knocks Out Antitrust Case Against LME

By Jan Wolfe |

A daring and novel argument by Latham & Watkins persuaded a federal judge that the London Metal Exchange Ltd., a private for-profit entity, should get sovereign immunity.

Ten-Year Old Battle Over Stoli Trademark Continues

By Ross Todd |

With its plot twists and sheer length, the decade-old battle for the Stolichnaya vodka trademark is starting to resemble a Russian novel.

Kirkland Scores for BP in Long-Running Pollution Case

By Jan Wolfe |

BP plc and its lawyers Kirkland & Ellis have likely finished off a long-running class action alleging that the oil company should cover cleanup costs from a shuttered oil refinery in southeast Kansas.

Fidel Castro

Spanish Bank Can't Deflect Claims by Cuba Terror Victims

By Jan Wolfe |

After winning about $3.5 billion in default judgments against the Republic of Cuba, Fidel Castro's persecuted political opponents and their families have cleared a hurdle in their bid to seize funds from global banks including Spain's Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria (BBVA).

Shareholder Firms Clash Over Client Referrals

By Jan Wolfe |

Brower Piven and Harwood Feffer worked together to tee up plaintiffs for an investor class action that ultimately settled for $586 million. But the relationship has since soured, judging by a new contract battle between the firms.

FHFA Reaches $1.2 Billion Deal with Goldman

By Susan Beck |

This deal brings the FHFA’s recovery from major banks to more than $21 billion, reinforcing that the agency’s litigation crusade, begun in 2011 against 18 banks and led by Philippe Selendy of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, has been a monumental success.

Starr’s Claims Against Chinese Company Survive Morrison

By Ross Todd |

Maurice Greenberg’s Starr Investments claimed it was fraudulently induced to buy stock in China MediaExpress, one of many Chinese companies to be listed on a U.S. stock exchange through a so-called reverse merger.

BP Squelches False Claims Act Suit Over Oil Platform

By Jan Wolfe |

"The genesis of this suit is a disgruntled layman's speculation about complex laws and engineering, abetted by ideologues," wrote a Houston federal judge about the purported whistleblower suit.

Stephen Neal

Litigator of the Week: Stephen Neal of Cooley

By Jan Wolfe |

When Roche tried to stake a claim to Gilead Sciences' blockbuster Hepatitis C drug, Gilead turned to Cooley to neutralize the threat.

Whistleblowers Stand Out in $16.65 Billion BofA Deal

By Susan Beck |

More than $1 billion of Thursday's megasettlement with Bank of America resolves claims first brought by private whistleblowers—including one case involving a two-time False Claims Act tipster who's married to one of "The Real Housewives of New Jersey."

Finnegan Beats Humira IP Licensing Claims for AbbVie

By Jan Wolfe |

A U.K. arthritis research trust overreached by demanding more patent royalties from drugmaker and longtime licensee AbbVie, an appeals court ruled on Thursday.

Banks Lose Last-Ditch Bid to Block NCUA Claims as Time-Barred

By Jan Wolfe |

The Tenth Circuit ruled once again that the National Credit Union Administration didn't wait too long to sue big banks that sold billions of dollars in ill-fated mortgage-backed securities to federally chartered credit unions.

Vivendi Takes Aim at Remains of $9.3B Shareholder Verdict

By Jan Wolfe |

The U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Morrison v. NAB already helped slash a rare securities class action jury verdict against Vivendi. Now the company's lawyers at Weil and Cravath are busy trying to bury what's left of the spoils.

Second Circuit Swats Down Fee Bid in Citi Say-on-Pay Case

By David Bario |

Barely 24 hours after hearing oral arguments, a federal appellate panel refused Wednesday to revive claims that plaintiffs lawyers deserve $6 million in fees for supposedly helping to oust former Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit and another Citi exec two years ago.

McDermott Beats Back Drug Patent Challenge for Depomed

By Jan Wolfe |

The ruling, which Depomed said would extend its monopoly on the pain drug Gralise for a decade, is a huge relief for the small pharma company and its investors.

U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan

Judge Kaplan Blasts Plaintiffs in Irish Bank Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Motions for reconsideration are always a long shot. But they don't usually backfire as dramatically as they did Tuesday in a decision by U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan in Manhattan.

Pedestrians pass the entrance to Standard Chartered Plc's headquarters in London, U.K., on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012. Standard Chartered Plc rose as much as 5.1 percent in London after the bank settled a money-laundering probe for $340 million the day before it was due to appear at a hearing to defend its right to operate in New York. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

Lawsky Strikes Again With $300M Standard Chartered Fine

By David Bario |

It's not odd for regulators to demand independent monitors for companies caught breaking the rules. But it's rare to learn that a monitor found even more failures—starting the cycle of payment, official contrition and monitoring all over again.

Fraud Suit Over Twitter IPO Fizzles at Second Circuit

By Jan Wolfe |

Lawyers at Simpson Thacher made quick work of a $124 million lawsuit alleging that Twitter duped two investment advisers into propping up demand for its shares ahead of the company's initial public offering.

Pfizer World Headquarters in New York City.

Alabama Court Bucks Trend, Says Generic Patient Can Sue Pfizer

By Jan Wolfe |

The tort theory of "innovator liability"—the notion that brand-name drug companies can be held liable for inadequate warnings on other manufacturers' generic versions of their drugs—has been widely panned on appeal. But innovator liability isn't dead yet.

N.Y. Superintendent of Financial Services Benjamin Lawsky

Spotlight Falls on Sullivan & Cromwell in PwC Settlement

By Susan Beck |

For the second time this summer, a major law firm has come under scrutiny for its questionable role advising a bank on transactions with sanctioned countries.

Sheikh Ahmed Yassin.

The Global Lawyer: Hamas on Trial

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

As Israeli-Palestinian violence swirls anew, a jury judges the terror crimes of old.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan.

S&C Prevails Again for Porsche in Battle With Hedge Funds

By Ross Todd |

Echoing a 2012 ruling by a state appeals court, the Second Circuit agreed with Porsche's lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell that billions of dollars in claims against the German automaker don't belong in the United States.

Oracle, Redwood Shores, Calif.

Oracle Scores in Rimini Street Copyright Row

By Jan Wolfe |

A ruling by a federal judge in Nevada chips away at the obstacles confronting Oracle and its lawyers at Bingham McCutchen and Boies, Schiller & Flexner as they inch toward a long-awaited trial.

Defense lawyers Brett Ingerman, Shand Stephens and Anthony Coles of DLA Piper, left, walk into Brooklyn federal court Aug. 14 for opening arguments in <em>Linde v. Arab Bank</em>. Gary Olsen, right, is representing the victims of two dozen Hamas attacks and their families.

The Terror Docket

With trial in Linde v. Arab Bank now underway in Brooklyn, see our roundup of the other key Anti-Terrorism Act cases unfolding in U.S. courts.

U.S. Supreme Court.

FCPA Targets Ask Supreme Court to Define 'Foreign Official'

By Jan Wolfe |

With their clients facing a combined 22 years in prison, lawyers at Perkins Coie and Foley & Lardner are urging the U.S. Supreme to shed light on what it means to bribe a foreign official in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Michael Hausfeld

Litigators of the Week: Michael Hausfeld of Hausfeld LLP and William Isaacson of Boies, Schiller & Flexner

By Jan Wolfe |

Hausfeld and Isaacson's landmark win in O'Bannon v. NCAA promises to transform the business of college sports—and the fate of the student athletes who play them.

Second Circuit Sides With Siemens in FCPA Whistleblower Case

By Susan Beck |

The ruling is a victory for Siemens and its lawyers at Kirkland. But it's a disappointment for those who hoped the court would clarify whether Dodd-Frank protects employees who are fired after blowing the whistle internally but before alerting the SEC.

U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan

Willkie Preserves Copyright Win for Haitian Photographer

By Jan Wolfe |

The ruling is the latest in a string of victories for photojournalist Daniel Morel and his lead trial lawyer, Joseph Baio of Willkie Farr & Gallagher, who may soon be financially rewarded for a case he's called a labor of love.

Bernie Madoff

Judge Trims Madoff Trustee's Suit Against Merkin Funds

By Jan Wolfe |

Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler, the liquidation trustee for Bernie Madoff's fraud-soaked investment firm, suffered a second setback this week in his bankruptcy court fight with J. Ezra Merkin and the Madoff feeder funds he managed.

The Global Lawyer: Cleary's Litigation Slump

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

In the past six months Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton litigators have lost a string of historic cases. Powerful entities routinely ask Cleary to push the envelope in international law. Lately it hasn't worked out well.

Judge Nixes Facebook Fee Bid in Rembrandt Patent Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Facebook Inc. and its lawyers at Cooley have lost their bid to recover attorney fees from Rembrandt Social Media, the nonpracticing entity they slayed at trial in June.

Las Vegas Judge Sides With NML in Argentine Bonds Spat

By Ross Todd |

The hedge fund NML and its lawyers at Dechert won a discovery ruling in Las Vegas that could help the company collect a small fraction of the $1.7 billion they're demanding from Argentina.

Google, Law Profs Join Battle Over $1.5B Marvell Verdict

By Jan Wolfe |

A group of major tech companies and academics have thrown their weight behind Marvell Semiconductor's bid to reverse a $1.54 billion trial loss to Carnegie Mellon University, arguing that the verdict was based on a dangerous ruling applying U.S. patent law to overseas commerce.

Susman Godfrey Wipes Out $283M Verdict in Satellite IP War

By Jan Wolfe |

A federal judge in San Diego ruled that that a do-over is needed in ViaSat's case against Space Systems/Loral in order "to prevent a miscarriage of justice."

Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell

Vermont AG Beats Appeal by Accused Patent Troll MPHJ

By Lisa Shuchman |

Vermont can proceed with its lawsuit against the much-maligned patent holder MPHJ Technology in state court, the Federal Circuit ruled Monday, handing a victory to state AG William Sorrell and to other states that have passed consumer protection laws to thwart patent trolls.

New VirnetX Patent Case Survives Apple Challenge

By Jan Wolfe |

The patent licensing company VirnetX got a boost on Friday in its latest fight with Apple, persuading a federal judge in East Texas that Apple can't revive defenses from an earlier case that culminated in a $368 million verdict for VirnetX.

Judge Won't Toss Antitrust Class Actions Against MLB, NHL

By Ross Todd |

Major League Baseball, the National Hockey League and cable broadcasters are stuck fighting claims that they schemed to shield regional sports networks from competition for live game broadcasts.

Irving Picard

Madoff Trustee Loses Bid to Block Fairfield, Merkin Deals

By Jan Wolfe |

Irving Picard, the trustee tasked with unwinding Bernie Madoff's investment firm, has hit another wall in his efforts to block two big-dollar settlements with companies that once funneled cash into Madoff's Ponzi fraud.

Gary Osen

DLA, Plaintiffs Prepare for Arab Bank Terror Funding Trial

By Jan Wolfe |

The first-ever U.S. terrorism financing trial represents a big challenge for defense lawyers at DLA Piper, and a historic opportunity for the unusual alliance of plaintiffs attorneys behind the case.

Chadbourne Wins Reprieve for Broadcaster in MLB Rights Spat

By Jan Wolfe |

Mid-Atlantic Sports Network, a broadcaster mostly controlled by the Baltimore Orioles, has bought itself an extra inning in its bid to undo an arbitration panel's decision that it owes about $80 million in telecast licensing revenue to the Washington Nationals.

Litigator of the Week: David Wasinger of The Wasinger Law Group

By Jan Wolfe |

In his first and only forays into whistleblower litigation, Wasinger helped the government win nearly $2 billion from Wall Street—including a $1.27 billion ruling against Bank of America that came at precisely the wrong time for the bank.

Carlyle Hangs Tight in Buyout Firms Collusion Case

By David Bario |

Shareholders have now inked deals worth $475.5 million with private equity firms accused of scheming to drive down the value of major leveraged buyout deals. But Carlyle Group and its lawyers at Latham have shown no signs of surrender ahead of a looming trial this fall.

Citi Dodges CDO Claims Brought by S. Korea's Woori Bank

By Jan Wolfe |

Judge Jed Rakoff may have thought Citigroup's $285 million settlement with the SEC amounted to little more than a slap on the wrist. But at least the SEC recovered something from Citi, which is more than we can say for South Korea's Woori Bank and its lawyers at Hausfeld.

U.S. Patent & Trademark Office

After PTO Loss, Webvention Patent Campaign Fizzles

By Jan Wolfe |

More than four years after Webvention LLC began peppering hundreds of companies with licensing demands for allegedly infringing its sole patent, the prolific and controversial nonpracticing entity may have finally reached the end of the line.

Judge Blocks Diageo Whiskey Line in Explorers Club Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

With help from Boies Schiller, the Explorers Club in New York won a highly unusual court order blocking the international liquor giant Diageo from selling a line of whiskeys called the Johnnie Walker Explorers' Club Collection.

Appeals Court Sides With Barclays in Battle for Lehman Assets

By Ross Todd |

The Second Circuit on Tuesday affirmed a big victory for Barclays and its lawyers at Boies, Schiller & Flexner in long-simmering litigation over the collapse of Lehman Brothers, ruling that Barclays is entitled to billions in disputed Lehman assets.

U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff

Rakoff Grudgingly Approves $285 Million Citigroup Deal

By Ross Todd |

U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff didn't give up without signaling that the Second Circuit made a terrible error in forcing him to approve the SEC's settlement with Citigroup over a doomed-to-fail investment.

The American International Building, located in New York, NY.

Investors Settle AIG Crisis Claims for $970.5 Million

By Jan Wolfe |

After Halliburton lost its bid to upend the securities litigation landscape at the U.S. Supreme Court, AIG and its lawyers at Weil, Gotshal & Manges opted to cut their losses in an investor class action stemming from the financial crisis.

Evening silhouette of Sherlock Holmes’s statue in London, England.

Posner Rips Conan Doyle Estate (Again) Over Sherlock Copyrights

By Jan Wolfe |

Likening the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to a shakedown artist, Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit has once again ruled for a California lawyer who tussled with the estate over copyright licensing fees.

L'Etat C'est ... An East Texas Patent Plaintiff?

By Lisa Shuchman |

State-sponsored France Brevets and its lawyers at McKool Smith won a fight over their preferred U.S. battleground, persuading a judge to keep a patent infringement suit against HTC and LG Electronics in the plaintiffs-friendly Eastern District of Texas.

Covington Scores for Roche in Accutane Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

After nearly a decade of mass tort litigation in New Jersey, Roche's lawyers won a ruling on Monday that could help the company stamp out claims that it failed to warn the public about side effects associated with its acne treatment Accutane.

The Global Lawyer: The Real Yukos Shocker

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The $50 billion Yukos arbitration award got the big headlines this week. But a smaller Yukos award by the European Court of Human Rights could have even greater implications for Russia's future.

A vial of Allergan Inc. Botox cosmetic and a syringe.

Latham, Wachtell File Takeover Defense Suit for Allergan

By Ross Todd |

Allergan claims that hostile bidder Valeant colluded with activist investor Bill Ackman, enabling Ackman's hedge fund Pershing Square to trade on inside information.

Second Circuit Sets New Rule for FINRA Cases

By Susan Beck |

For the first time, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has announced a bright-line rule to determine which investors are entitled to arbitration with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

An Intel® Core™ processor.

Intel Defeats Class Cert for Consumer Antitrust Case

By Rodd Todd |

Four years ago, a special master recommended that class certification be denied in a case brought by plaintiffs who bought computers equipped with Intel microprocessors. A judge has finally agreed.

Yas Banifatemi and Emmanuel Gaillard of Shearman & Sterling announce a $50 billion arbitral award against the Russian federal on July 28 at Shearman & Sterling's London office.

Litigators of the Week: Emmanuel Gaillard and Yas Banifatemi of Shearman & Sterling

By Jan Wolfe |

We've always rejected strict formulas for choosing Litigators of the Week. Here's an exception: If you win a $50 billion judgment in a complex, politically charged battle with a major world power, you've got it made.

Patent Foes Square Off Over New Fee-Shifting Rules

By Lisa Shuchman |

It's been three months since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on fee-shifting in patent infringement lawsuits. But battles over how to apply the new standards are just beginning, as two companies at the center of the high court's rulings illustrated this week.

Amazon Ducks Online Ad Patent Claims; Next Up: Microsoft

By Jan Wolfe |

Inventor Sheldon Goldberg and lawyers at Dovel & Luner dropped a patent case against Amazon without recovering a cent. But they immediately picked a new fight, suing Microsoft on the same day in the same court over some of the same patents on online advertising technology.

BofA Fined $1.27 Billion Over Countrywide Mortgage 'Hustle'

By Jan Wolfe |

What does a dead cow have to do with a mortgage sold by Countrywide Financial? U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff has the answer, and it's a costly one for Bank of America.

Judge Shira A. Scheindlin, Southern District of New York

Judge Guts $1.4B Damages Claim in Wyly Brothers' Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Ahead of a damages-only bench trial set for next month, a judge precluded the SEC from recovering the total profits it accuses Sam and Charles Wyly of netting from stock trades orchestrated through a secret offshore system.

A DuPont technician examines Kevlar brand fibers.

DuPont, Kolon Feud Over Freezing $1B Trade Secrets Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Facing claims by both DuPont and the Justice Department that it stole secrets related to Kevlar, Kolon's lawyers say keeping the civil case on track would give prosecutors an unfair advantage.

Burford Breaks Half-Billion Dollar Mark After Bond Offering

By Ross Todd |

With capital raised in a first-of-its-kind bond offering by Burford's U.K. subsidiary, the company said its war chest of assets under management now exceeds $500 million.

Leonid Nevzlin in June 2005 in Herzlya, Israel.

The Global Lawyer: On Money, Justice and Yukos

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Legally, the Yukos oligarchs deserve their $50 billion. Morally, it's murky.

Amazon Kindle eBook reader.

Jenner Unplugs Patent Challenge to Amazon's Kindle Charger

By Jan Wolfe |

Handing a win to Amazon and its lawyers at Jenner & Block, a judge tossed claims that the charger sold with Amazon's Kindle e-reader is identical to one sold by a small company called VoltStar Technologies.

Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein testifies before a Senate panel in April 2010.

Goldman Mulls Deal as Banks Suffer New Blow in FHFA Cases

By Jan Wolfe |

With trial approaching for Goldman, RBS, HSBC and Nomura, a judge rejected the argument that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac knew they were being misled about billions of dollars in residential mortgage-backed securities they purchased before the financial crisis.

Yukos oil company chief executive officer Mikhail Khodorkovsky (R) stands behind a glass wall at a courtroom in Moscow, on December 29, 2010.

Yukos Majority Shareholders Hit a $50 Billion Gusher

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

A tribunal in The Hague held the Russian Federation liable for $50 billion, finding that it bankrupted the country's largest oil producer to plunder the company's assets.

With Help From Sidley, Lyft Lands in New York

By Ross Todd |

After reaching a deal with skeptical New York officials, the ride-sharing company announced that riders could begin using the service on Friday.

Judge Rejects Fee-Shifting Bid in Newegg Patent Spat

By Jan Wolfe |

Despite a U.S. Supreme Court decision that encourages more fee-shifting in patent cases, the online retailer and enthusiastic "troll hunter" Newegg Inc. got trounced on Friday in a fee fight with the patent licensing entity Pragmatus Telecom.

Appeals Court Derails Massive Chiquita Alien Tort Case

By Jan Wolfe |

In the latest ruling to address the ever-narrowing scope of the Alien Tort Statute, the Eleventh Circuit dismissed long-standing claims that Chiquita Brands International facilitated war crimes by paramilitary groups in Colombia.

Litigator of the Week: Michael Carvin of Jones Day

By Jan Wolfe |

Two contradictory appellate court rulings this week framed the next battle over Obamacare. Carvin was at the center of both of them.

Partner Outs Dodd-Frank Tipster, Demands Cut of $14.7M Award

By David Bario |

Despite receiving thousands of tips and shelling out eight awards to Dodd-Frank whistleblowers, the SEC has managed to keep the identities of its informers tightly under wraps. But a leak was inevitable, and now we've got one, courtesy of a fight over—what else—money.

Bankrupt Biotech Targets Nixon Peabody, Mintz Levin

By David Bario |

Neogenix Oncology Inc., a bankrupt would-be developer of cancer diagnostic and treatment products, blamed its outside lawyers for allowing the company to pursue an illegal fund-raising strategy for more than five years.

Countdown Begins for Ruling in $114 Billion Yukos Case

By Jan Wolfe |

The potentially record-shattering arbitration award will be unveiled Monday by former Yukos shareholders and their longtime counsel at Shearman & Sterling.

U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken during his nomination hearing in 2011.

Citing 'Smoking-Gun' Claims, Judge OKs ITT Investor Case

By Jan Wolfe |

ITT Educational Services and its lawyers at Gibson Dunn suffered their latest setback on Tuesday, when a judge refused to dismiss most of a shareholder class action alleging that the for-profit education company duped investors about rising student loan default rates.

Second Circuit Socks Travelers With $500 Million Asbestos Tab

By Ross Todd |

The ruling extends a recent hot streak for Bancroft's Paul Clement, who's scored a series of rapid-fire reversals in cases involving Hobby Lobby, Aereo and the Chinese heavy equipment giant Sany Group.

Google Stumbles in Texas IP Fight With Apple Group

By Jan Wolfe |

Google's lawyers at Quinn Emanuel lost an early bid to knock out patent infringement claims brought by Rockstar Consortium, the Apple-backed group that snatched up Nortel Networks' patent portfolio in a 2011 auction.

Deloitte Knocks Out Hedge Funds' Suit Over China Audits

By Jan Wolfe |

Handing a win to defense lawyers at Sidley and Hughes Hubbard, a judge on Monday dismissed claims that Deloitte defrauded ChinaCast Education Corp. investors by failing to detect alleged fraud at the Shanghai-based company.

Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell

Patent 'Troll' MPHJ Takes Aim at Vermont in Fed. Circ. Appeal

By Lisa Shuchman |

The much-maligned patent holder and its lawyers at Farney Daniels argue that MPHJ's rights—not to mention the U.S. patent system—are under assault by Vermont's attorney general and a federal judge in Burlington.

Judge Leonard Davis

Software Company Fights to Preserve $25M Texas Verdict

By Jan Wolfe |

Despite admitting to using faked evidence to win a $25 million verdict last March, LBDS Holding Company urged a federal judge in East Texas not to scrap the jury's damages award.

Holy Smokes! Fla. Jury Socks RJR With $23.6 Billion Verdict

By David Bario |

Even if Friday's verdict is promptly whittled down, it's a reminder of the tobacco industry's failure to rein in an endless stream of tobacco cases pending in Florida in the wake of Engle v. Liggett.

Quinn Emanuel's GM Assignment Is Good Timing for Firm

By Jan Wolfe |

As some of the firm's biggest cases wind down, Quinn Emanuel is branching out and landing major new assignments, including a review of GM's litigation strategy.

Swipe Fee Case Moves Ahead Against Card Companies

By Susan Beck |

A group of major merchants that opted out of a $5.7 billion antitrust settlement with Visa and MasterCard have cleared a hurdle in their case against the card companies over swipe fees.

Apple, LG Beat Back Appeal in $180 Million Patent Row

By Jan Wolfe |

The decision by the Federal Circuit comes just one week after oral arguments that pitted the smartphone makers' heavyweight lawyers at Fish & Richardson and Jones Day against equally formidable counsel from Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan.

Gregory Garre of Latham & Watkins.

Litigator of the Week: Gregory Garre of Latham & Watkins

By Jan Wolfe |

Navigating his way through racial politics, education policy and U.S. Supreme Court precedent, Garre won a ruling this week that preserves student affirmative action at the University of Texas at Austin.

Judge Shira A. Scheindlin, Southern District of New York

Lloyd's Can't Duck Claims Over MBIA Restructuring Fight

By David Bario |

After toiling through four years of litigation related to MBIA Inc.'s 2009 restructuring, the bond insurer's lawyers at Kasowitz Benson won a ruling this week that puts Lloyd's of London and other underwriters on the hook for a hefty portion of MBIA's defense tab.

E-Book Combatants Hedge Their Bets in $450M Apple Deal

By Jan Wolfe |

The settlement calls for Apple to pay between $450 million and nothing at all, depending on what an appeals court does with a July 2013 liability verdict from U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan.

Quinn Emanuel Notches Another Settlement in BofA Litigation

By Jan Wolfe |

In Wednesday's deal with Bank of America, Quinn Emanuel client AIG will pocket $650 million in cash, plus its pro rata share of an earlier $8.5 billion settlement between BofA and mortgage-backed securities investors.

Second Circuit Tosses Deutsche Bank Shareholder Class Action

By David Bario |

Handing a win to lawyers at Cahill and Skadden, the Second Circuit affirmed Wednesday that its 2011 decision in Fait v. Regions Financial dooms a long-running securities class action against Deutsche Bank AG and a half-dozen big underwriting banks.

Fifth Circuit Revives BP Oil Spill ERISA Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

A U.S. Supreme Court decision from last month has breathed new life into claims that BP mismanaged employee stock ownership programs that plummeted in value after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Obama Overstepped on Chinese Wind Power Project, Court Rules

By Ross Todd |

Handing a win to Bancroft's Paul Clement, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled Tuesday that the Obama Administration ignored due process when it barred a Chinese-owned company from acquiring a planned wind farm project near a U.S. Navy facility.

Quinn Emanuel Trims Taxi Drivers' Class Action Against Uber

By Jan Wolfe |

Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan chipped away this week at an unfair competition lawsuit over client Uber Inc.'s practices in Chicago. But the upstart transportation company isn't even close to freeing itself from similar cases around the country.

Long-Running Disk Drive Patent Fight Winds Down

By Jan Wolfe |

After 14 years of litigation, a billion-dollar patent and trade secrets case against Seagate Technology and Compaq (now Hewlett-Packard) may finally be over.

Underwriters Can't Dodge Puda Coal Securities Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

For the law firms driving consolidated litigation over Puda's demise, Monday's ruling is a welcome bit of good news. For the boutique investment banks Macquarie Capital and Brean Murray Carret & Co., not so much.

What's Missing in Citigroup's $7 Billion RMBS Deal?

By Susan Beck |

The DOJ cited "the strength of the evidence" warranting Citigroup's $7 billion payment over sales of residential mortgage-backed securities. But there's little evidence to be found in the statement of facts accompanying Monday's deal.

Pliva Must Face Claims Over Generic Reglan

By Ross Todd |

Mayer Brown's Hank Bullock persuaded the Supreme Court of Iowa that Schwarz Pharma and Wyeth can't be sued over generic drugs they didn't distribute. Pliva, which allegedly hid the risks of its generic version of Reglan, wasn't so lucky.

Mark Lemley

Another Acacia Patent Bites the Dust at the Federal Circuit

By Jan Wolfe |

The Federal Circuit invalidated an Acacia Research patent related to tagging digital images on Friday, handing a win to a big group of retailers and digital camera companies represented by Mark Lemley of Durie Tangri.

Missing a Chance to Close the Justice Gap

By Susan Beck |

Recent developments involving the ABA and state bar leaders in North Carolina highlight the same problem: Well-intentioned or not, the legal profession lacks real solutions for millions of Americans who need a lawyer but don't have the means to hire one.

Ecuador Blasts Judge in Chevron RICO Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

Steven Donziger isn't the only one who has a bone to pick with U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan, the Manhattan judge who sided with Chevron Corporation earlier this year in sprawling litigation over legacy oil pollution in the Ecuadorean Amazon.

Rengan Rajaratnam, left, exits federal court with his attorney Daniel Gitner in New York on Tuesday, July 8, 2014.

Litigator of the Week: Daniel Gitner of Lankler Siffert & Wohl

By Jan Wolfe |

Gitner kept U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara from claiming another scalp in his war on insider trading. More importantly, he kept his client out of jail.

Goldman Sachs Ruling Can't Save Cosmetics Class Action

By Ross Todd |

What do mortgage-backed securities have to do with antiwrinkle creams? Not a whole lot, the Second Circuit told a group of disappointed class action lawyers on Thursday.