Top Stories

Patent Foes Square Off Over New Fee-Shifting Rules

By Lisa Shuchman |

It's been three months since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on fee-shifting in patent infringement lawsuits. But battles over how to apply the new standards are just beginning, as two companies at the center of the high court's rulings illustrated this week.

Amazon Ducks Online Ad Patent Claims; Next Up: Microsoft

By Jan Wolfe |

Inventor Sheldon Goldberg and lawyers at Dovel & Luner dropped a patent case against Amazon without recovering a cent. But they immediately picked a new fight, suing Microsoft on the same day in the same court over some of the same patents on online advertising technology.

BofA Fined $1.27 Billion Over Countrywide Mortgage 'Hustle'

By Jan Wolfe |

What does a dead cow have to do with a mortgage sold by Countrywide Financial? U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff has the answer, and it's a costly one for Bank of America.

Judge Shira A. Scheindlin, Southern District of New York

Judge Guts $1.4B Damages Claim in Wyly Brothers' Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Ahead of a damages-only bench trial set for next month, a judge precluded the SEC from recovering the total profits it accuses Sam and Charles Wyly of netting from stock trades orchestrated through a secret offshore system.

A DuPont technician examines Kevlar brand fibers.

DuPont, Kolon Feud Over Freezing $1B Trade Secrets Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Facing claims by both DuPont and the Justice Department that it stole secrets related to Kevlar, Kolon's lawyers say keeping the civil case on track would give prosecutors an unfair advantage.

Burford Breaks Half-Billion Dollar Mark After Bond Offering

By Ross Todd |

With capital raised in a first-of-its-kind bond offering by Burford's U.K. subsidiary, the company said its war chest of assets under management now exceeds $500 million.

Leonid Nevzlin in June 2005 in Herzlya, Israel.

The Global Lawyer: On Money, Justice and Yukos

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Legally, the Yukos oligarchs deserve their $50 billion. Morally, it's murky.

Amazon Kindle eBook reader.

Jenner Unplugs Patent Challenge to Amazon's Kindle Charger

By Jan Wolfe |

Handing a win to Amazon and its lawyers at Jenner & Block, a judge tossed claims that the charger sold with Amazon's Kindle e-reader is identical to one sold by a small company called VoltStar Technologies.

Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein testifies before a Senate panel in April 2010.

Goldman Mulls Deal as Banks Suffer New Blow in FHFA Cases

By Jan Wolfe |

With trial approaching for Goldman, RBS, HSBC and Nomura, a judge rejected the argument that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac knew they were being misled about billions of dollars in residential mortgage-backed securities they purchased before the financial crisis.

Yukos oil company chief executive officer Mikhail Khodorkovsky (R) stands behind a glass wall at a courtroom in Moscow, on December 29, 2010.

Yukos Majority Shareholders Hit a $50 Billion Gusher

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

A tribunal in The Hague held the Russian Federation liable for $50 billion, finding that it bankrupted the country's largest oil producer to plunder the company's assets.

With Help From Sidley, Lyft Lands in New York

By Ross Todd |

After reaching a deal with skeptical New York officials, the ride-sharing company announced that riders could begin using the service on Friday.

Judge Rejects Fee-Shifting Bid in Newegg Patent Spat

By Jan Wolfe |

Despite a U.S. Supreme Court decision that encourages more fee-shifting in patent cases, the online retailer and enthusiastic "troll hunter" Newegg Inc. got trounced on Friday in a fee fight with the patent licensing entity Pragmatus Telecom.

Appeals Court Derails Massive Chiquita Alien Tort Case

By Jan Wolfe |

In the latest ruling to address the ever-narrowing scope of the Alien Tort Statute, the Eleventh Circuit dismissed long-standing claims that Chiquita Brands International facilitated war crimes by paramilitary groups in Colombia.

Litigator of the Week: Michael Carvin of Jones Day

By Jan Wolfe |

Two contradictory appellate court rulings this week framed the next battle over Obamacare. Carvin was at the center of both of them.

Partner Outs Dodd-Frank Tipster, Demands Cut of $14.7M Award

By David Bario |

Despite receiving thousands of tips and shelling out eight awards to Dodd-Frank whistleblowers, the SEC has managed to keep the identities of its informers tightly under wraps. But a leak was inevitable, and now we've got one, courtesy of a fight over—what else—money.

Bankrupt Biotech Targets Nixon Peabody, Mintz Levin

By David Bario |

Neogenix Oncology Inc., a bankrupt would-be developer of cancer diagnostic and treatment products, blamed its outside lawyers for allowing the company to pursue an illegal fund-raising strategy for more than five years.

Countdown Begins for Ruling in $114 Billion Yukos Case

By Jan Wolfe |

The potentially record-shattering arbitration award will be unveiled Monday by former Yukos shareholders and their longtime counsel at Shearman & Sterling.

U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken during his nomination hearing in 2011.

Citing 'Smoking-Gun' Claims, Judge OKs ITT Investor Case

By Jan Wolfe |

ITT Educational Services and its lawyers at Gibson Dunn suffered their latest setback on Tuesday, when a judge refused to dismiss most of a shareholder class action alleging that the for-profit education company duped investors about rising student loan default rates.

Second Circuit Socks Travelers With $500 Million Asbestos Tab

By Ross Todd |

The ruling extends a recent hot streak for Bancroft's Paul Clement, who's scored a series of rapid-fire reversals in cases involving Hobby Lobby, Aereo and the Chinese heavy equipment giant Sany Group.

Google Stumbles in Texas IP Fight With Apple Group

By Jan Wolfe |

Google's lawyers at Quinn Emanuel lost an early bid to knock out patent infringement claims brought by Rockstar Consortium, the Apple-backed group that snatched up Nortel Networks' patent portfolio in a 2011 auction.

Deloitte Knocks Out Hedge Funds' Suit Over China Audits

By Jan Wolfe |

Handing a win to defense lawyers at Sidley and Hughes Hubbard, a judge on Monday dismissed claims that Deloitte defrauded ChinaCast Education Corp. investors by failing to detect alleged fraud at the Shanghai-based company.

Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell

Patent 'Troll' MPHJ Takes Aim at Vermont in Fed. Circ. Appeal

By Lisa Shuchman |

The much-maligned patent holder and its lawyers at Farney Daniels argue that MPHJ's rights—not to mention the U.S. patent system—are under assault by Vermont's attorney general and a federal judge in Burlington.

Judge Leonard Davis

Software Company Fights to Preserve $25M Texas Verdict

By Jan Wolfe |

Despite admitting to using faked evidence to win a $25 million verdict last March, LBDS Holding Company urged a federal judge in East Texas not to scrap the jury's damages award.

Holy Smokes! Fla. Jury Socks RJR With $23.6 Billion Verdict

By David Bario |

Even if Friday's verdict is promptly whittled down, it's a reminder of the tobacco industry's failure to rein in an endless stream of tobacco cases pending in Florida in the wake of Engle v. Liggett.

Quinn Emanuel's GM Assignment Is Good Timing for Firm

By Jan Wolfe |

As some of the firm's biggest cases wind down, Quinn Emanuel is branching out and landing major new assignments, including a review of GM's litigation strategy.

Swipe Fee Case Moves Ahead Against Card Companies

By Susan Beck |

A group of major merchants that opted out of a $5.7 billion antitrust settlement with Visa and MasterCard have cleared a hurdle in their case against the card companies over swipe fees.

Apple, LG Beat Back Appeal in $180 Million Patent Row

By Jan Wolfe |

The decision by the Federal Circuit comes just one week after oral arguments that pitted the smartphone makers' heavyweight lawyers at Fish & Richardson and Jones Day against equally formidable counsel from Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan.

Gregory Garre of Latham & Watkins.

Litigator of the Week: Gregory Garre of Latham & Watkins

By Jan Wolfe |

Navigating his way through racial politics, education policy and U.S. Supreme Court precedent, Garre won a ruling this week that preserves student affirmative action at the University of Texas at Austin.

Judge Shira A. Scheindlin, Southern District of New York

Lloyd's Can't Duck Claims Over MBIA Restructuring Fight

By David Bario |

After toiling through four years of litigation related to MBIA Inc.'s 2009 restructuring, the bond insurer's lawyers at Kasowitz Benson won a ruling this week that puts Lloyd's of London and other underwriters on the hook for a hefty portion of MBIA's defense tab.

E-Book Combatants Hedge Their Bets in $450M Apple Deal

By Jan Wolfe |

The settlement calls for Apple to pay between $450 million and nothing at all, depending on what an appeals court does with a July 2013 liability verdict from U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan.

Quinn Emanuel Notches Another Settlement in BofA Litigation

By Jan Wolfe |

In Wednesday's deal with Bank of America, Quinn Emanuel client AIG will pocket $650 million in cash, plus its pro rata share of an earlier $8.5 billion settlement between BofA and mortgage-backed securities investors.

Second Circuit Tosses Deutsche Bank Shareholder Class Action

By David Bario |

Handing a win to lawyers at Cahill and Skadden, the Second Circuit affirmed Wednesday that its 2011 decision in Fait v. Regions Financial dooms a long-running securities class action against Deutsche Bank AG and a half-dozen big underwriting banks.

Fifth Circuit Revives BP Oil Spill ERISA Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

A U.S. Supreme Court decision from last month has breathed new life into claims that BP mismanaged employee stock ownership programs that plummeted in value after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Obama Overstepped on Chinese Wind Power Project, Court Rules

By Ross Todd |

Handing a win to Bancroft's Paul Clement, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled Tuesday that the Obama Administration ignored due process when it barred a Chinese-owned company from acquiring a planned wind farm project near a U.S. Navy facility.

Quinn Emanuel Trims Taxi Drivers' Class Action Against Uber

By Jan Wolfe |

Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan chipped away this week at an unfair competition lawsuit over client Uber Inc.'s practices in Chicago. But the upstart transportation company isn't even close to freeing itself from similar cases around the country.

Long-Running Disk Drive Patent Fight Winds Down

By Jan Wolfe |

After 14 years of litigation, a billion-dollar patent and trade secrets case against Seagate Technology and Compaq (now Hewlett-Packard) may finally be over.

Underwriters Can't Dodge Puda Coal Securities Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

For the law firms driving consolidated litigation over Puda's demise, Monday's ruling is a welcome bit of good news. For the boutique investment banks Macquarie Capital and Brean Murray Carret & Co., not so much.

What's Missing in Citigroup's $7 Billion RMBS Deal?

By Susan Beck |

The DOJ cited "the strength of the evidence" warranting Citigroup's $7 billion payment over sales of residential mortgage-backed securities. But there's little evidence to be found in the statement of facts accompanying Monday's deal.

Pliva Must Face Claims Over Generic Reglan

By Ross Todd |

Mayer Brown's Hank Bullock persuaded the Supreme Court of Iowa that Schwarz Pharma and Wyeth can't be sued over generic drugs they didn't distribute. Pliva, which allegedly hid the risks of its generic version of Reglan, wasn't so lucky.

Mark Lemley

Another Acacia Patent Bites the Dust at the Federal Circuit

By Jan Wolfe |

The Federal Circuit invalidated an Acacia Research patent related to tagging digital images on Friday, handing a win to a big group of retailers and digital camera companies represented by Mark Lemley of Durie Tangri.

Missing a Chance to Close the Justice Gap

By Susan Beck |

Recent developments involving the ABA and state bar leaders in North Carolina highlight the same problem: Well-intentioned or not, the legal profession lacks real solutions for millions of Americans who need a lawyer but don't have the means to hire one.

Ecuador Blasts Judge in Chevron RICO Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

Steven Donziger isn't the only one who has a bone to pick with U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan, the Manhattan judge who sided with Chevron Corporation earlier this year in sprawling litigation over legacy oil pollution in the Ecuadorean Amazon.

Rengan Rajaratnam, left, exits federal court with his attorney Daniel Gitner in New York on Tuesday, July 8, 2014.

Litigator of the Week: Daniel Gitner of Lankler Siffert & Wohl

By Jan Wolfe |

Gitner kept U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara from claiming another scalp in his war on insider trading. More importantly, he kept his client out of jail.

Goldman Sachs Ruling Can't Save Cosmetics Class Action

By Ross Todd |

What do mortgage-backed securities have to do with antiwrinkle creams? Not a whole lot, the Second Circuit told a group of disappointed class action lawyers on Thursday.

Dechert, Funds Win New York Debt Fight with Africa's DRC

By Jan Wolfe |

More than 20 years after Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo) defaulted on loans from Citibank NA and other banks, a U.S. judge ordered the poverty-stricken nation to pay a combined $69 million to two hedge funds that snatched up the country's debt.

Iran Loses $1.9 Billion Appeal in NY Bank Funds Case

By Julie Triedman |

The Second Circuit on Wednesday affirmed a decision ordering nearly $2 billion held in frozen New York bank accounts to be handed over to claimants who sued Iran over its role in multiple acts of terrorism.

Pfizer World Headquarters in New York City.

Loss of Key Witness Dooms Pfizer Investor Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

In a victory for Beth Wilkinson of Paul Weiss and her cocounsel at Simpson Thacher and DLA Piper, a federal judge in Manhattan refused to give plaintiffs a new chance to explain how Pfizer caused their losses.

U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara at a press conference in January.

Rajaratnam Verdict Ends U.S. Attorney's Winning Streak

By Jan Wolfe |

With some indirect help from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, Rengan Rajaratnam and his lawyers at Lankler Siffert & Wohl have snapped Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara's undefeated record in insider-trading cases.

Orrick White-Collar Chair Departs as Firm Exits Seed Theft Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Was Orrick spooked by a senior partner's involvement in a corporate espionage case related to China's hunger for GMO seed technology? The firm won't say, but the partner is gone and the firm has withdrawn from the high-profile case even as it continues to expand.

U.S. District Judge Paul Engelmayer.

Judge Stomps Litigation Blitz Over Diet Planning Patent

By Ross Todd |

For three years the patent holder DietGoal Innovations has hounded dozens of food and media companies in courts all over the country, alleging that everyone from NBCUniversal's Bravo Media unit to Dunkin' Donuts infringed its patent for a system of computerized meal planning.

Bill Lee of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr.

Court Sides With Wilmer, Kenyon & Kenyon in Intel Chip Patent Row

By Jan Wolfe |

The Federal Circuit ruled Monday that Intel's computer chips don't infringe on tiny X2Y Attenuators' patents, dealing a final blow to X2Y's unlikely bid to block sales of Apple and Hewlett-Packard computers that use the Intel chips.

Irving Picard

Madoff Trustee Barred from Seeking Foreign Bank Funds

By Jan Wolfe |

While most people were enjoying the tail end of a long holiday weekend, U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff was busy Sunday delivering a key victory to foreign banks targeted by Irving Picard, the liquidation trustee for Bernie Madoff's defunct investment firm.

The Global Lawyer: Is Arab Bank Headed for Trial?

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Oyez, oyez, oy vey iz mir. This summer's trial of the century may just happen after all.

Paul Clement

Litigator of the Week: Paul Clement of Bancroft

By Jan Wolfe |

In the span of less than a week, the former U.S. solicitor general unraveled the Affordable Care Act's contraceptive mandate and derailed a threat to the broadcast and cable TV industries.

Steven Donziger

Donziger Returns Fire as Chevron Appeal Heats Up

By David Bario |

Lawyers for New York attorney Steven Donziger reloaded this week in their epic fight with Chevron, asking an appeals court to vacate a finding that Donziger procured a $9.5 billion judgment against the oil giant through wholesale fraud.

Irell Steers Goldman Banker Past SEC Insider Trading Probe

By Jan Wolfe |

Irell & Manella's John Hueston said the SEC once appeared on the brink of bringing insider trading claims against ex-Goldman Sachs banker Matthew Korenberg.

Census Applicants Win Class Cert Over Background Checks

By Ross Todd |

In what appears to be the first order of its kind, a judge green-lighted a class action on behalf of about 250,000 African-Americans who claim they were subjected to discriminatory criminal background checks by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Texas Judge Nixes Bid to Transfer Android Patent Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Which jurisdiction, Eastern Texas or Northern California, will oversee Apple's proxy patent war with Google? Both of them, according to a new order from U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap in Marshall, Tx., who refused to cede the litigation to another judge in San Francisco.

BNP Deal Shines Spotlight on Law Firms' Sanctions Advice

By Susan Beck |

In detailing their record settlement with BNP Paribas this week, prosecutors suggested that the French Bank relied on questionable advice from at least one major law firm to justify violating U.S. sanctions regimes.

Employers, EEOC Gear Up for High Court Showdown

By Jan Wolfe |

The EEOC closed out 2013 with a key win in its discrimination case against Mach Mining, persuading an appeals court that the agency's targets can't second-guess its prelitigation conduct. Now the EEOC is facing a much bigger test at the U.S. Supreme Court.

Mark Zuckerberg

Ceglia, Prosecutors Spar Over Facebook Files

By Jan Wolfe |

With a potential fraud conviction in his future, Paul Ceglia is digging into the past to fight criminal charges that he fabricated a contract and other evidence in his failed suit claiming to own a 50 percent of Facebook Inc.

Sullivan & Cromwell Guides BNP in $9 Billion Criminal Deal

By Jan Wolfe |

Sullivan & Cromwell helped steer BNP Paribas SA to a historic guilty plea and settlement on Monday, bolstering the firm's reputation as go-to counsel for banks locked in hostile negotiations with regulators.

Irving Picard

Madoff Trustee Hits Dead End in Suits Against Banks

By Jan Wolfe |

The U.S. Supreme Court has finally put an end to Irving Picard's quest to recover billions of dollars from HSBC, UniCredit and other banks he accused of facilitating Bernard Madoff's fraud.

U.S. Supreme Court.

High Court Won't Intervene in Terror Financing Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Paving the way for trial and complicating the efforts of Jordan's Arab Bank to persuade jurors that its hands are clean, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to review a ruling that Arab Bank should be sanctioned for refusing to turn over documents.

Aereo's antennas, dormant for now.

Aereo Hits 'Pause' After Losing Supreme Court Showdown

By Jan Wolfe |

Less than a week after the U.S. Supreme Court shattered the legal argument underpinning Aereo Inc.'s business model, the online television streaming service told customers that it's shutting down while its lawyers try to pick up the pieces.

Jay Lefkowitz, senior litigation partner at Kirkland & Ellis in New York. HANDOUT.

Siding with Drugmakers, Sixth Circuit Tosses Painkiller Cases

By Jan Wolfe |

The appeals court knocked out claims that dozens of drug companies ignored the risks of a painkiller pulled from the market in 2010.

Miguel Estrada

Gibson Dunn Extends Hot Streak With NLRB Ruling

By Ross Todd |

Thursday's ruling in National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning caps a month of litigation victories involving Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.

David Boies

Litigator of the Week: David Boies of Boies, Schiller & Flexner

By Ross Todd |

Unlike Boies's most famous cases, most Americans will never hear of Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund. But for corporations, or anyone whose bread is buttered litigating securities class actions, Halliburton was the big news at the Supreme Court this week.

Simpson Thacher Revives $1B Norex Suit Over Oil Venture

By David Bario |

After churning through more than 12 years of litigation, three law firms, at least five dismissals and who knows how much cash, Canada's Norex Petroleum Ltd. finally caught a break on Thursday in its billion-dollar brawl with a gaggle of oil companies and Russian oligarchs.

Ruling Hobbles NPE's East Texas Patent Litigation Campaign

By Jan Wolfe |

The prolific non-practicing entity EMG Technology has enjoyed great success asserting a patent on mobile website technology. But after six years of lawsuits, EMG's patent is now on life support following a rare pretrial defense win in the Eastern District of Texas.

Shire Scores in Patent Fight Over ADHD Drug

By Jan Wolfe |

Drugmaker Shire plc announced a big win Wednesday in a patent fight that's pitted the company's lawyers at IP boutique Frommer Lawrence & Haug against a phalanx of larger firms.

Aereo founder and CEO Chet Kanojia.

For Aereo, a Failure of Innovation Through Litigation

By David Bario |

For Aereo's lawyers, the company's copyright battle with the television broadcast industry both epitomized bet-the-company litigation and turned the formula inside out.

IP Group Bashes Jones Day as Trademark 'Bully'

By Jan Wolfe |

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Jones Day threatened a spurious lawsuit in hopes of censoring protected speech by a critic of the firm's Detroit bankruptcy work.

Companies Ink $500 Million Deal to End Truck Parts War

By Jan Wolfe |

The deal between Meritor Inc. and Eaton Corp. caps nearly a decade of antitrust litigation that pulled in lawyers from at least eight law firms.

Jay Lefkowitz, senior litigation partner at Kirkland & Ellis in New York. HANDOUT.

After Calif. Ruling, Kirkland Targets Teacher Tenure in N.Y.

By Jan Wolfe |

When Gibson Dunn lawyers won a ruling this month that California's teacher tenure laws are unconstitutional, the firm predicted copycat suits would follow. Sure enough, now Jay Lefkowitz and his colleagues at Kirkland & Ellis are taking up the mantle in New York.

Securities Lawyers Dodge a Bullet with Halliburton Ruling

By Jan Wolfe |

In Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, the Supreme Court had a chance to shut down securities litigation as we know it. Instead, Monday's decision has plaintiffs lawyers thanking their stars—and may even promise more billable hours for defense lawyers.

Banks Cite Superfund Ruling in New Bid to Beat FHFA Claims

By Jan Wolfe |

Three hold-out banks that have refused to settle with the FHFA—Nomura, HSBC and Goldman Sachs—rehashed old arguments to defeat claims that they misled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac about the riskiness of billions of dollars in securities backed by home loans.

Boies, Reed Smith Square Off in Bizarre Phone Scam Case

By Ross Todd |

It's not often that litigators from Boies, Schiller & Flexner and Reed Smith go to battle over less than $3 million. But a peculiar lawsuit involving a fake semiconductor company CEO and Chinese wire transfers has the two firms duking it out in Manhattan federal court.

NFL Players Union Scores Reversal in Pay Cap Case

By Jan Wolfe |

The Eighth Circuit gave the NFL Players Association an opening to revive its $3 billion lawsuit accusing league owners of colluding to secretly cap salaries for the 2010 season. But the union's lawyers at Winston & Strawn and Latham & Watkins still face a long road to recovering any damages.

Antitrust Lawyers Gear Up for Trial in Transmission Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

A squadron of top litigators has descended on Delaware, ready to duke it out over claims that truck components manufacturer Eaton Corp. owes billions of dollars in damages to rival Meritor Inc.

Theodore Grossman

Litigator of the Week: Theodore Grossman of Jones Day

By Jan Wolfe |

Grossman didn't just help Macy's win its high-profile bench trial against rival J.C. Penney over the Martha Stewart brand. He publicly shamed J.C. Penney's entire leadership for trying to lure Stewart away.

Christopher Landau of Kirkland & Ellis.

PwC, Citco Escape Madoff Feeder Fund Class Action

By Ross Todd |

Lawyers at Kirkland and Paul Weiss tentatively freed their clients from a class action targeting them over services they provided to Fairfield Greenwich Group, a manager of so-called feeder funds that funneled billions of dollars into Bernie Madoff's Ponzi scheme.

Blair Nicholas of Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann.

Bernstein Litowitz Targets Banks in New RMBS Assault

By Jan Wolfe |

Judging by the flurry of lawsuits Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann just unleashed against some of the world's top banks, mortgage-backed securities litigation has life in it yet.

Skadden Stomps Securities Class Action Against BlackBerry

By David Bario |

BlackBerry Ltd. shareholders enjoyed some rare good tidings on Thursday when the company posted a surprise profit. But the news wasn't so good for investors-turned-plaintiffs suing BlackBerry in a proposed securities class action.

11th Cir. Shocks Conscience With Race Case Ruling

By Susan Beck |

White workers allegedly placed nooses around an Austal USA shipyard in Mobile and repeatedly taunted black workers with slurs. But that didn't create a pervasive hostile work environment, the court held.

Plaintiffs Firms Jockey to Lead 'Flash Boys' Case

By Jan Wolfe |

The competition is heating up for plaintiffs firms jostling to win the lead counsel spot in litigation inspired by Michael Lewis's best-selling book on high-frequency trading.

The Global Lawyer: Hardcore Prosecution

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

On Tuesday the greatest child pornography prosecution in history concluded with the sentencing of the Ukrainian child pornographer Maksym Shynkarenko to 30 years in prison.

Keurig K-Cups.

Ropes Defeats Keurig Green Mountain Securities Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit affirmed a win that Ropes & Gray won for Keurig last year in Vermont, leaving the company free to fight other litigation battles related to its single-serving coffee brewers.

Apple Strikes Tentative E-Books Deal as Appeal Looms

By Jan Wolfe |

Apple is hedging its bets in the sprawling e-books antitrust litigation, agreeing to a settlement on damages that allows the company to continue fighting a year-old decision that it's liable for fixing e-book prices.

Rajat Gupta

Rajat Gupta Loses Latest Appeal as Prison Term Kicks Off

By Ross Todd |

On the same day that Gupta begins a two-year prison term for criminal insider trading, Wilmer's Seth Waxman lost a bid to contest a hefty fine and injunction won by the SEC in its parallel civil case.

KPMG Tax Shelter Scam Rejected by Ninth Circuit

By Susan Beck |

John Paul Reddam has a varied resume: businessman, former college philosophy professor, owner of the 2012 Triple Crown contender I'll Have Another, and failed tax shelter investor.

Cooley Prevails at Trial for Facebook Again

By Jan Wolfe |

The social media giant was accused of infringing patents that belonged to now-deceased Dutch computer programmer Joannes Van Der Meer, who was tinkering with a social networking website called SurfBook before his 2004 death.

WellCare Can't Be Coconspirator and Victim

By Ross Todd |

WellCare Health Plans' lawyers at Greenberg Traurig tried to use a federal victims' rights law to get restitution from former executives convicted of health care fraud. The Eleventh Circuit shot down that creative claim.

Hogan Lovells Challenges Vermont GMO Law

By Jan Wolfe |

Food industry trade groups are fighting back against Vermont's first-of-its-kind state law requiring the labeling of genetically engineered food, arguing that it violates the First Amendment as well as the Commerce Clause.

Appeals Court Invalidates Bristol-Myers Squibb's Hep B Patent

By Jan Wolfe |

In a win for the generic drug company Teva Pharmaceuticals and its lawyers at Winston & Strawn, the Federal Circuit knocked out a Bristol-Myers Squibb patent on the Hepatitis B drug Baraclude.

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr's Seth Waxman

Litigator of the Week: Seth Waxman of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr

By Jan Wolfe |

For the second time in two weeks, Waxman has clinched a victory at the U.S. Supreme Court. This latest win will allow his client Pom Wonderful to move forward with its false advertising claim against Coca-Cola.

Goldman, Bain Settle Antitrust Suit for $121 Million

By Ross Todd |

Ropes & Gray, Sullivan & Cromwell, Jones Day and Kirkland & Ellis reached the agreement Wednesday on behalf of the two companies, which were accused of conspiring with other private equity players to deflate the price of corporate takeovers.

First Circuit Rejects Med Monitoring in Raytheon Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Bingham prevails for Raytheon in a class action brought by plant workers who say they were exposed to dangerous beryllium dust and fumes.

Still from the 2001 The Fellowship of the Ring film.

Studios Seek DQ of Greenberg Glusker in Tolkien Dispute

By Ross Todd |

Warner Bros. and The Saul Zaentz Company claim that Greenberg Glusker accessed confidential attorney-client information by soliciting two former in-house lawyers who negotiated the original 1969 film rights agreements to the "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit."

Davis Polk Report: A Trickle of Whistleblower Awards

By Susan Beck |

Although $739 million been set aside to reward those who report wrongdoing in the financial markets, awards to date have barely dented those accounts.