Top Stories

Patent Plaintiff eDekka Beefs Up Texas Litigation Campaign

By David Bario |

Apple and a handful of other companies are fighting back against claims that they infringe a single 22-year-old patent that purportedly covers online shopping cart functions. But the cases—and the settlements— are piling up.

Jones Day's Gregory Katsas

Second Circuit Revives RICO Case Against R.J. Reynolds

By David Bario |

A unanimous Second Circuit panel ruled that 26 European countries can sue RJR for an alleged scheme in which criminal organizations used cigarette smuggling to launder money earned in the European narcotics trade.

Keker Scores for Google in GeoTag Patent Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Google won a ruling that it doesn't infringe Geotag's crown jewel patent, easily one of the most litigated patents in U.S. history. But the ruling arrives too late to help hundreds of Google customers that have already succumbed to Geotag's parent litigation machine.

Sixth Circuit Nixes Ford Win in EEOC Telecommuting Case

By David Bario |

Amid a crush of recent litigation failures, the EEOC scored a victory on Tuesday against appellate hotshot Eugene Scalia of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, reviving a case that a dissenting judge warned could backfire dramatically on employees.

Appeals Court Mostly Upholds Bingham Win in REIT Sale Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

The court ruled Wednesday that broker-dealer David Lerner Associates didn't violate federal securities laws in connection with the sale of five real estate investment trusts with a combined value of $6.8 billion.

3M Docked $26 Million Over Conduct in TransWeb Patent Case

By Jan Wolfe |

A federal judge in New Jersey put 3M on the hook for millions of dollars that TransWeb LLC spent on attorneys at Quinn Emanuel—plus millions more for good measure.

SAP, Versata Clash Over Endgame in $391 Million Patent Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Versata's lawyers at McKool Smith are accusing SAP of postponing the inevitable in a long, hard-fought battle over software patents.

Bancroft's Paul Clement

High Court Snubs Exxon in New York City MTBE Case

By David Bario |

Bancroft's Paul Clement argued that leaving the city's $104.7 million verdict against Exxon in place could open up "whole new arenas for abusive and speculative litigation." The U.S. Supreme Court apparently didn't find the situation quite so dire.

Judge Tosses $124 Million Fraud Suit Over Twitter IPO

By Jan Wolfe |

Simpson Thacher partners Bruce Angiolillo and Jonathan Youngwood made quick work of the case, which was filed by two investment firms claiming that Twitter duped them into propping up the company's pre-IPO valuation.

Sidley Clears Way for Tellabs Trade Secrets Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Did Fujitsu Ltd. steal trade secrets by stealthily purchasing and inspecting a rival's product? Thanks to a ruling for Tellabs in Chicago federal court, we're one step closer to finding out.

Judge Finds Inconsistencies in Younger Rajaratnam's Indictment

By Jan Wolfe |

Still facing a June 17 trial date on claims that he engaged in insider trading alongside his older brother Raj Rajaratnam, Rengam Rajaratnam may have caught a minor break on Friday with a ruling that could help narrow the indictment against him.

The Dam Breaks: Investors Take Aim at Herbalife

By Jan Wolfe |

Amid reports that Herbalife is under criminal investigation, the securities plaintiffs bar has finally pounced on the controversial nutritional supplements company.

Lululemon Missteps Don't Amount to Fraud, Judge Rules

By David Bario |

The company's see-through pants fiasco and similar blunders can't serve as the basis for a securities fraud class action against Lululemon, a judge in Manhattan confirmed on Friday. The ruling is a victory for defense teams at Weil and Paul Weiss.

Judge Shira A. Scheindlin, Southern District of New York

Scheindlin Defies Second Circuit in Alien Tort Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Manhattan U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled that South African apartheid victims can seek compensation from three Fortune 100 companies under the Alien Tort Statute, directly contradicting a Second Circuit ruling in another ATS case. 

Former SEC Lawyer Speaks Out on Agency's Failings

By Susan Beck |

An investigation of the SEC's case against Goldman Sachs revealed James Kidney as a rare voice willing to criticize his own agency. After a retirement speech last month that made waves on Wall Street and in Washington, Kidney elaborated on his concerns in an extensive interview.

Sidley Renews Pitch for China in Vitamin Makers' Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

With two Chinese companies facing a $157 million price-fixing verdict, the Chinese government is reasserting its position that the litigation should never have gotten off the ground because the defendants were acting at its behest.

Elkan Abramowitz

Patton Boggs Taps White-Collar Pro Abramovitz in Chevron Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Famed criminal defense attorney Elkan Abramowitz will help the beleaguered firm battle claims that its lawyers engaged in fraud while trying to enforce a $9.5 billion environmental judgment against Chevron Corporation.

U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa

Citing SCOTUS, Judge Revives Madoff Feeder Fund Claims

By Jan Wolfe |

Predictions that the Supreme Court's ruling in Chadbourne & Parke v. Troice would affect Bernie Madoff litigation proved correct this week, when a judge revived claims against one of Madoff's so-called feeder funds, Tremont Group.

Jury box

Kaye Scholer Scores Verdict in IP Row Over Airplane Parts

By Jan Wolfe |

Thanks to a quick jury verdict that could be worth tens of millions of dollars for their client, lawyers at Kaye Scholer are claiming a major victory in a Delaware patent case that nearly fizzled out three years ago.

Sidley Austin's Peter Keisler

Sidley Dents SEC's 'Conflict Minerals' Rule in D.C. Circuit

By Julie Triedman |

In the latest legal assault on government regulations promulgated under Dodd-Frank, the court ruled that the SEC can't force a company that uses minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo "to confess blood on its hands."

Google campus

Jenner Takes Aim at Google in Authors' Copyright Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

Some think the Second Circuit has already signaled its approval of Google's effort to digitize the world's books, albeit indirectly. After seven years of crusading against Google's project, the Authors Guild has tapped a new legal team and asked the court for a straight answer.

Winston Cements $503 Million Win in Battle of Tycoons

By Jan Wolfe |

Winston & Strawn's W. Gordon Dobie scored the half-billion dollar win for Israeli businessman Alexander Gliklad in a long-running fight with billionaire industrialist Michael Cherney.

The Verizon Headquarters at Manhattan - New York City. July 12, 2012. Credit: Bjoertvedt. (PUBLIC DOMAIN - WIKIMEDIA COMMONS).

Whistleblower Barred from Double-Dipping Against Verizon

By Jan Wolfe |

An appeals court has tossed a False Claims Act case against Verizon Communications Inc., ruling that the suit is barred by an earlier case in which the same whistleblower netted a big settlement. Wilmer Hale Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr advised Verizon.

Robbins Geller Faces Off with NHL Over Head Injuries

By Jan Wolfe |

Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd made a clumsy entrance into litigation over concussions in pro sports, filing a class action complaint against the National Hockey League that included a few attention-grabbing typos and factual errors.

stack of credit cards

Credit Card Companies Narrowly Escape Antitrust Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

Somewhat grudgingly, a federal judge in New York tossed claims that American Express, Discover and other companies used meetings organized by lawyers at Wilmer and Ballard Spahr to cook up a conspiracy to preempt consumer class actions.

AlixPartners Sues Consultants Poached by McKinsey & Co.

By Susan Beck |

The lawsuit, filed in Delaware Chancery Court by Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and Richards Layton & Finger, accuses former AlixPartners managing directors Eric Thompson and Ivo Naumann of breaching their employment agreements and stealing trade secrets.

JPMorgan Can't Dodge Online Payment Patent Claims

By Jan Wolfe |

When inventor Lakshmi Arunachalam gets involved in patent cases, strange things can happen. But one of her latest cases quietly cleared a hurdle this week, leaving JPMorgan Chase & Co. facing claims that it infringed patents by letting its customers pay bills online.

Sixth Circuit Slams EEOC in Kaplan Bias Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Not only did the EEOC base its case on flawed methodology, the court ruled, but the agency employs the same hiring practice that it claimed Kaplan was using to discriminate against minorities.

Trial Looms in Former IP Client's Case Against Baker Botts

By Lisa Shuchman |

Did Baker Botts betray one of its clients by sharing its secrets with a rival and hiding its duplicity? Or is the law firm a victim of attempts by an unsuccessful company to blame its failings on others?

W. Mark Lanier of The Lanier Law Firm.

Lanier Says $9B Actos Verdict Sends Message to Takeda, Lilly

By Jan Wolfe |

Even though it's likely to shrink dramatically, famed trial lawyer W. Mark Lanier says the eye-popping verdict blows away all those he's won before.

Latham's Gregory Garre

Latham Scores for Amazon in Rovi Patent Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Despite the efforts of Durie Tangri's Mark Lemley, Rovi Corporation hit another dead end Tuesday in its litigation campaign against the digital TV industry. But rather than raising the white flag, in the wake of its defeat Rovi was threatening a follow-up case involving new patents.

Joel Laitman

Plaintiffs Cry Foul in Credit Suisse Securities Class Action

By Julie Triedman |

When damning internal emails were unsealed last month in a securities suit against Credit Suisse, The New York Times wasn't the only one who took notice. Plaintiffs lawyers pursuing a separate mortgage-backed securities class action also snapped to attention, and on Monday they accused Credit Suisse of failing to disclose the documents in their own case.

All work and no pay?

Viacom Intern Case Moves Ahead as Employers Eye Second Circuit

By Julie Triedman |

Another employment class action brought on behalf of unpaid interns cleared a hurdle when a federal judge in Manhattan conditionally certified an FLSA class action against Viacom Inc.

Teva Asks High Court to Block Generics Ahead of Copaxone Ruling

By Jan Wolfe |

Teva Pharmaceuticals v. Sandoz could usher in a new era of deference to trial judges in patent cases. But Teva's lawyers reminded the Supreme Court on Monday that there's real money at stake in the case as well.

Perseverance Pays Off for Paul Hastings in DuPont Secrets Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Paul Hastings still has a ways to go if it hopes to vindicate client Kolon Industries in its trade secrets battle with DuPont Co. But Kolon's big appellate win last week has clearly boosted the spirits of its defense lawyers.

Court OKs Attack on DataTern Patents by SAP, Microsoft

By Jan Wolfe |

After DataTern accused dozens of SAP and Microsoft customers of patent infringement, the two companies sprang into action and used declaratory judgment actions to knock out DataTern's patents in 2012. The Federal Circuit blessed that tactic on Friday, but with some reservations.

International Arbitration Heavyweights Debut Global Boutique

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Billing itself as the world's first global arbitration boutique, Three Crowns is being launched Monday by a sextet of top international arbitration lawyers from Freshfields, Covington & Burling, Shearman & Sterling and Jones Day.

Stephen Kohn

Plaintiffs Firm Accuses KBR of Silencing Whistleblowers

By Jan Wolfe |

Thanks to some aggressive litigating by Kohn, Kohn & Colapinto, regulators and legislators are reportedly looking into whether military contractor KBR Inc. silenced whistleblowing by requiring employees to sign confidentiality agreements.

Cigarette Makers Launch New Bid to End Engle Woes

By Julie Triedman |

Tobacco companies facing thousands of smoker lawsuits in Florida filed their ninth batch of U.S. Supreme Court petitions last week, claiming that the Florida courts are trampling on their constitutional rights in the so-called Engle progeny litigation.

Kolon Escapes $919 Million Verdict in Battle With DuPont

By Jan Wolfe |

The Fourth Circuit reluctantly vacated DuPont's $919 million trade secrets win against Kolon Industries in a fight over Kevlar, handing a big win to appellate ace Paul Clement of Bancroft PLLC and cocounsel at Paul Hastings.

Bernie Madoff, before the fall.

Madoff Feeder Fund Tremont Group Dodges Investor Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

The ruling, which also dismisses claims against Tremont parents Oppenheimer and Mass Mutual, is a loss for attorneys at Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, who based their complaint partly on an exclusive jailhouse meeting with Madoff in 2009.

Activists assembled outside the Supreme Court during arguments in Wal-Mart v. Dukes. March 29, 2011. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

After Class Action Shut-Out, Wal-Mart Plaintiff Clears a Hurdle

By Susan Beck |

At least one more woman will be able to proceed with employment discrimination claims against Wal-Mart Stores Inc., thanks to a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. On Monday the Fifth Circuit reversed a lower court and held that Texas resident Stephanie Odle's individual claims aren't time-barred.

The Court of Appeals in Albany

N.Y. Court Won't Revive Cerberus Suit Against Paul Hastings

By Jan Wolfe |

Ableco Finance, a financing unit of Cerberus Capital Management, has hit a dead end in a malpractice lawsuit alleging that Paul Hastings bungled the terms of a $125 million deal in 2008.

Steve Molo

GE Unit Loses Bid to Sink Megabucks Mortgage Suits

By Jan Wolfe |

Rejecting defense arguments by Jenner & Block, a Paul Krugman-quoting federal judge in Connecticut refused to toss claims brought by MoloLamken and Ropes & Gray over more than $4 billion in mortgage-backed securities.

U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe

News Corp, Murdoch Beat Investor Claims Over Hacking Scandal

By Jan Wolfe |

With help from Skadden, News Corp. and its CEO, Rupert Murdoch, have dodged a proposed securities fraud class action over the company's phone-hacking scandal—at least for the time being.

Hewlett-Packard headquarters in Palo Alto, CA.

HP Reaches $57 Million Deal to End Class Action Over WebOs

By David Bario |

Hewlett-Packard shocked investors when it pulled the plug on the company's much-touted WebOs operating system and signaled a wholesale shift in business strategy. Now HP and its lawyers at Morgan Lewis and Gibson Dunn have agreed to a $57 million settlement to make investor claims over the episode go away.

Patton Boggs, Washington, D.C.

Chevron Judge Green-Lights Fraud Claims Against Patton Boggs

By Jan Wolfe |

Patton Boggs received some unwelcome but hardly surprising news on Monday, when a judge allowed Chevron Corporation to pursue claims that lawyers at the firm made misrepresentations to judges and engaged in other misconduct while enforcing a $9.5 billion environmental judgment against the oil giant.

JPMorgan, Dimon Can't Shake London Whale Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

Did Jamie Dimon engage in securities fraud when he downplayed the London Whale trading scandal as a "tempest in a teapot"? Thanks to a ruling issued on Monday, we could eventually see a ruling on that question—or a settlement to make it go away.

Morgan Stanley Exec Takes Top Job at Litigation Funding Upstart

By David Bario |

William Strong, co-CEO of Morgan Stanley's Asia-Pacific operations and a member of the bank's global management committee, will take the helm at Longford Capital on May 1.

Judge: SCOTUS 'First Sale' Ruling Can't Derail Lexmark Patent Case

By Lisa Shuchman |

The Supreme Court clarified a murky area of the law—and dished out bad news for copyright holders— when it ruled last year that copyright owners can't block U.S. resales of "gray market" products that are manufactured and first sold abroad. Some importers would like to see the same logic extended to products protected by U.S. patents, but so far the courts haven't been willing to oblige.

MBS Class Action Continues to Haunt Goldman

By Jan Wolfe |

Having twice dismissed the case without prejudice, a federal judge is now allowing discovery in a class action against Goldman Sachs, which is accused of duping investors in a $780 million mortgage-backed security. Sullivan & Cromwell is advising Goldman.

John Froemming of Jones Day

Jury Returns Mixed Verdict in Reynolds Infringement Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Reynolds Consumer Products and its lawyers at Jones Day have won a trade dress infringement verdict against competitor Handi-Foil Corp for willfully infringing its well-known aluminum foil packaging. But the company struck out on several parallel claims.

Skadden Win in Bank of America Case May Undercut DOJ's Strategy

By Jan Wolfe |

A U.S. magistrate judge's recommendation to dismiss claims that Bank of America defrauded investors in a mortgage-backed security may weaken the Department of Justice's efforts to use a statute known as FIRREA.

Bank of America Deal Is Latest Triumph for FHFA, Quinn Emanuel

By Jan Wolfe |

The Federal Housing Finance Agency's legal assault on Wall Street moved closer to a merciful end for the banks on Wednesday, when Bank of America retreated to the tune of $9.5 billion.

Time to End the Waiting Game in Second Circuit Citigroup Case

By Susan Beck |

It took U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff just six weeks to reject Citigroup's $285 million settlement with the SEC. So why is the Second Circuit taking so long to decide whether Rakoff was right?

Sidley Austin's Carter Phillips

Sidley's Phillips Knocks Out Verdict in Cornwell Contract Row

By Jan Wolfe |

More than a year after best-selling author Patricia Cornwell won a $50.9 million jury verdict against her financial advisers, Sidley's Carter Phillips persuaded a judge that a do-over is required. But Cornwell's lawyer, Joan Lukey of Ropes & Gray, isn't ready to declare the verdict lost.

Mark Zuckerberg

Amid Threat of Reprisals in Facebook Case, Ceglia Lawyer Vows Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

After a long wait, a judge has dismissed Paul Ceglia's lawsuit alleging that a decade-old contract with Mark Zuckerberg entitles him to a massive stake in Facebook. But the clock is still ticking on whether Facebook's legal team at Gibson Dunn will follow through on an earlier threat to go after Ceglia's lawyers for their roles in the case.

Seth Waxman

Wilmer's Waxman Strikes Out in Rajat Gupta Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

It's starting to look like all the appellate hired guns in the world can't dent the Manhattan U.S. attorney's undefeated record in insider trading trials.

Supreme Court Rookie Scores With Lexmark Ruling

By Jan Wolfe |

Tuesday's Supreme Court decision in Lexmark v. Static Control didn't just expand the ranks of companies with standing to bring Lanham Act claims. It also vindicated Static Control's decision to let a young, newly minted Bartlit Beck partner handle the oral argument.

FINRA Arbitrator Allegedly Faked Background, Law License

By David Bario |

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority—the securities industry-funded Wall Street regulator and investment arbitrator—has weathered its share of storms over the last couple years. Now another one is brewing, and it's a doozy.

The Global Lawyer: The Noose Tightens on Chevron Litigation Backers

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Chevron's case against online poker magnate Russell DeLeon over his funding of the Lago Agrio pollution case is gaining traction. Any funder or lawyer involved in the business of enforcing foreign judgments would be wise to pay attention.

CDO Manager Borrows From Rajat Gupta's Playbook in SEC Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Wing Chau, who's been in hot water with the Securities and Exchange Commission since last year, now says the agency is violating his constitutional rights by using its administrative machinery—and not the federal courts—to press its case.

U.S. to Join Supreme Court Showdown on Patent Eligibility

By Lisa Shuchman |

The Supreme Court on Friday granted the U.S. solicitor general permission to participate in oral arguments next week in Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. V. CLS Bank International, giving the government a voice in one of the most closely watched patent cases of the year.

Credit Suisse Settles MBS Claims With FHFA for $885 Million

By Jan Wolfe |

The odds of seeing the Federal Housing Finance Agency go to trial this year in its litigation campaign against Wall Street got a lot slimmer on Friday, when Credit Suisse AG became the latest defendant to throw in the towel.

Kirkland Defeats Whistleblower Suit Against Pfizer

By Jan Wolfe |

A federal judge on Friday dismissed claims by a sales representative that Pfizer paid kickbacks to doctors and promoted Felctor, a patch used to treat acute pain, for off-label uses.

Another Court Tosses Jury Verdict Against Johnson & Johnson

By Jan Wolfe |

For the second time this year, appellate lawyers at O'Melveny & Myers wiped out a huge jury verdict against Johnson & Johnson and subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals over their marketing of the antipsychotic drug Risperdal.

Patented stamp

Patent Ruling Highlights Pressure on Plaintiffs

By Lisa Shuchman |

Should patent plaintiffs be held to the same heightened pleading standards that other litigants have had to adopt since the Supreme Court's rulings in Twombly and Iqbal?

Jeff Eichmann

Big Law Defectors Score $85M Verdict in Google Patent Trial

By Jan Wolfe |

When Greg Dovel and Jeff Eichmann left prestigious law firms to become contingency fee plaintiffs lawyers, some of their Harvard Law School classmates were left scratching their heads. But no one was second-guessing their career path this week, when the duo won a big verdict in a patent case against Google Inc.

Gibson Dunn Lodges $32 Million Fee Request in Chevron Case

By Jan Wolfe |

The request—made two weeks after Chevron scored its biggest win yet in the case—represents just a tiny fraction of Chevron's legal costs in its battle with Steven Donziger and his Amazon clients.

Artist Richard Prince Settles Landmark Fair Use Case

By Jan Wolfe |

In the third big copyright settlement announced this week, famed "appropriation" artist (and Boies Schiller client) Richard Prince inked a confidential deal to resolve claims that he ripped off works by photographer Patrick Cariou.

Google, Viacom End Long-Running Copyright Feud

By Jan Wolfe |

Rather than continue to duke it out in the latest appeal, Viacom and Google's YouTube inked an out-of-court settlement in their precedent-setting copyright fight over video uploads.

Joel Laitman

Credit Suisse Class Action Ruling Could Spell Trouble for Banks

By Julie Triedman |

Plaintiffs lawyers at Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll moved a step forward this week in a securities class action alleging that Credit Suisse duped investors into buying mortgage-backed securities backed by shoddy home loans.

Goldieblox Commercial

Beastie Boys Settle Copyright Fight Over GoldieBlox Video

By Susan Beck |

After attracting top IP lawyers at Orrick and Durie Tangi in its tussle with the Beastie Boys over a viral video, toymaker GoldieBlox is apologizing and paying up to make the case go away.

Texas Roots Don't Help Plaintiff in Intel Patent Fight

By Jan Wolfe |

Patent licensing company Stragent built a dog park and a community garden in East Texas, among other charitable endeavors. But when the moment of truth arrived in a patent infringement case Stragent brought against Intel, jurors sided with defense lawyers at Perkins Coie.

Winston & Strawn Hits NCAA With Suit over Players' Pay

By Jan Wolfe |

Will Jeffrey Kessler of Winston & Strawn upend the business of college sports?

Kasowitz Takes Aims at Insurers for MBIA Legal Fees

By Jan Wolfe |

Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedman guided MBIA Inc. through many of its legal battles stemming from the financial crisis. Can the firm now help MBIA recoup millions of dollars in legal fees from its insurers?

The Global Lawyer: The Supreme Court Sides With the Arbitrators

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

By favoring BP Group this month in its battle with Argentina, the Supreme Court sided with arbitrators over judges, with the U.S. arbitration industry over its rivals, and with the international investment system over scofflaws.

Billionaire Ronald Perelman

Court Makes Going-Private Deals Tougher to Challenge

By Jan Wolfe |

The Delaware Supreme Court dismissed a suit alleging that MacAndrews & Forbes enriched itself at the expense of shareholders when it took over an affiliate in 2011, marking a win for defense lawyers at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom and Willkie Farr & Gallagher.

U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission building in Washington, D.C. August 21, 2013. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Lions Gate to Pay $7.5 Million for Misleading Investors

By Susan Beck |

The Securities and Exchange Commission found that Lions Gate, advised by Wachtell Lipton, gave its shareholders misleading information about a major stock transaction that was designed to thwart corporate raider Carl Icahn's takeover bid.

Keurig Coffee Maker.

Treehouse Sets Off Flurry of Suits Against Keurig

By Jan Wolfe |

Following in Treehouse Food's footsteps, Grant & Eisenhofer has sued Keurig Green Mountain, accusing the single-serve coffee brewer of scheming to monopolize the market. Several others, including McKool Smith and Motley Rice, have filed similar suits in recent days.

Former Eastern District of Texas Judge Nails Win for Akin Gump

By Jan Wolfe |

Charles "Chad" Everingham's knowledge of the litigation hot spot helped Akin Gump client LBDS Holdings Company secure a $24.4 million jury award on its contract claim and $760,000 on a trade secrets misappropriation claim against ISOL Technology Inc.

Cooley, Fenwick Beat Back LendingTree Patent Claims at Trial

By Jan Wolfe |

The online lending exchange LendingTree, a subsidiary of Charlotte, N.C.-based Tree Inc., struck out on Wednesday in a patent infringement trial against the Internet companies Nextag, Zillow and Adchemy.

EEOC Botched Bias Case Against Jewelry Giant, Judge Rules

By Jan Wolfe |

Yet another judge has dismissed employment discrimination claims brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on the grounds that the agency ignored the unique duties it owes to its litigation targets.

Judge Tosses Transocean Class Action Ahead of Supreme Court Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

In a case of awkward timing, a judge on Tuesday dismissed a securities class action against Transocean Ltd. on the basis of an appellate decision that the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to consider reversing just the day before.

Chinese Investment Giant Dodges N.Y. Securities Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

A federal judge in Manhattan dismissed a class action lawsuit alleging that a unit of Chinese state-owned CITIC Group facilitated securities fraud on the part of Puda Coal.

Supreme Court to Weigh Time Limits for Securities Class Actions

By Jan Wolfe |

If one investor in a security files a timely class action, is the statute of repose tolled for all class members? The question may seem arcane, but the answer could be worth plenty to securities issuers and their underwriters, not to mention the securities plaintiffs bar.

Uniloc Suffers Setback in East Texas Patent Fight

By Lisa Shuchman |

Accused patent troll Uniloc has asserted its patents against dozens of tech companies. Now a small software company and its New England lawyers are claiming an outsized victory against Uniloc in the Eastern District of Texas—and saying the win will help other Uniloc targets as well.

Federal Circuit Affirms Acacia Loss in 'Abstract' Patent Case

By Ross Todd |

The Federal Circuit on Monday cemented a defense win for a coalition of data storage companies facing patent infringement claims from a subsidiary of Acacia Research Corporation. Durie Tangri's Clement Roberts argued the case for all three defendants: EMC Corp., NetApp Inc., and Quantum Corporation.

Theodore Boutrous Jr.

After Chevron Win, Dole Victory Caps Big Week for Gibson Dunn

By David Bario |

What do banana plantation workers in Nicaragua have in common with villagers beset by oil production fallout in the Ecuadorean Amazon? Plenty, it turns out. Both teamed up with lawyers intent on collecting big bucks from multinational corporations. Then Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher stepped in for the defense, and the plaintiffs' cases went to hell.

commercial drone

Kramer Levin Fights Off FAA Attempt to Fine Drone Pilot

By Ross Todd |

In a groundbreaking case concerning the commercial use of drones, Kramer Levin knocked out a $10,000 fine the Federal Aviation Administration had imposed on a drone pilot who remotely flew a 56-inch foam glider to shoot aerial footage for an ad agency.

No Boies v. Wells Rematch as Terra Firma Takes Citigroup Case to U.K.

By Ross Todd |

After more than four years and who knows how much money spent duking it out in the U.S., Terra Firma Capital Partners and Citigroup have opted to let an English court deal with their dispute over the 2007 sale of music label EMI.

CBOE's Three Patents Face Risk of Invalidation

By Lisa Shuchman |

The PTO's Patent Trial and Appeal Board has instituted postgrant reviews of three patents owned by the Chicago Board Options Exchange that are at the center of a suit against the International Securities Exchange, represented by Winston & Strawn.

Insider Trading Case Marks Latest Mixed Verdict for SEC

By Jan Wolfe |

The latest came on Thursday in an insider trading case against Andrew Jacobs, a former executive at The Hershey Co., and his brother Leslie Jacobs.

Fourth Circuit Revives Soldiers' Claims Against Halliburton, KBR

By Jan Wolfe |

In a ruling that could limit the scope of sovereign immunity for military contractors, an appeals court has revived claims that KBR Inc. and Halliburton injured U.S. service members by disposing of waste in open-air "burn pits" in war zones overseas.

Wilmer Beats Ricoh Bid to Undo Kodak Jury Win

By Ross Todd |

Ricoh and its lawyers at Quinn Emanuel failed Thursday in their attempt to knock out a portion of the $75.8 million the company owes Eastman Kodak Company in a patent licensing dispute.

Justices Weigh Class Action Compromise in Halliburton Case

By Tony Mauro |

Wednesday's blockbuster arguments on the fate of securities class actions pitted Boies Schiller's David Boies against Aaron Streett of Baker Botts. But an amicus brief filed by Vinson & Elkins on behalf of a group of law professors nearly stole the show.

Music Rights Holder SESAC Must Face Antitrust Claims

By Ross Todd |

A judge in New York refused to throw out part of an antitrust class action brought by TV station owners against SESAC, a music licensing organization that represents thousands of composers. The ruling comes just months after a Pennsylvania judge ruled that radio broadcasters are likely to prevail on similar claims.

ETP Wins $319 Million Pipeline Verdict as S&C Client Dodges Fallout

By Jan Wolfe |

Energy Transfer Partners won at least $319 million this week in its lawsuit alleging that Enterprise Products Partners improperly backed out of a pipeline development deal. But ETP failed to persuade jurors that a codefendant, Enbridge Inc., interfered with the partnership.

Fifth Circuit to BP on Oil Spill Deal: Live With It

By Susan Beck |

The court told BP and its lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis and Gibson Dunn that the company has no one to blame for the Deepwater Horizon claims process but itself.

Chevron v. Donziger: The Beginning of the End

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

After 20 years and hundreds of millions of dollars in litigation costs, we have a winner in the Chevron Ecuador dispute. And of all the countless legal battlegrounds, it's now clearer than ever that U.S. litigation was the main event.

Steven Donziger

In Chevron Ruling, a Cautionary Tale for Lawyers

By Jan Wolfe |

Plenty of attorneys besides Steven Donziger were drawn into the morass of Chevron's Ecuadorean environmental battle over the years. Tuesday's ruling in Chevron's fraud case against the plaintiffs can be read as a tale of lawyers run amok and sometimes led astray.

High Court Takes Up New Securities Conundrum in Omnicare Case

By Jan Wolfe |

With Monday's cert grant in Omnicare, Winston & Strawn won a chance to resolve a circuit split over what constitutes a false statement under federal securities laws. Plus: Some good news for Aereo as it prepares for April arguments in its Supreme Court showdown with TV broadcasters.

William Lee of WilmerHale

Federal Circuit Revives Apple Patent Case, Hears $368M VirnetX Appeal

By Ross Todd |

One Federal Circuit panel issued a decision reviving a patent infringement lawsuit against the company in California, while another heard arguments in the appeal of a whopping $368 million jury verdict that Apple lost to VirnetX Inc. in 2012.

Actelion Settles With Generics Over Access to Drug Samples

By Ross Todd |

When does a branded drug maker have to turn over product samples to generic competitors? An antitrust battle between Actelion Pharmaceuticals and three of its generic rivals offered some clues, but the case settled Friday without providing a definitive answer.

Freshfields, Hogan Lovells Knock Out IPCom's Patent Claims

By Jan Wolfe |

The German company IPCom GmbH, which has been called Europe's first "patent troll" by its opponents, lost three big infringement cases on Friday, including one in which it was seeking €1.6 billion ($2.2 billion) from Apple Inc.

Eastern District of Texas Debuts Two Tracks for Patent Cases

By Jan Wolfe |

The Eastern District of Texas has ushered in a new approach to case management that could streamline patent cases and drive down costs, which some experts say is proof that the courts—and not Congress—are best-suited to reform patent litigation.

Quinn Emanuel Wins on Jurisdiction in Indonesia Arbitration

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

World Bank arbitrators asserted jurisdiction over more than $1 billion in claims brought by Churchill Mining plc and its Australian affiliate alleging that the Republic of Indonesia expropriated Churchill's coal mining concession in East Kutai, Indonesia.

John Froemming of Jones Day

Jones Day Beats Dismissal Bid in Reynolds Wrap Row

By Jan Wolfe |

Partner John Froemming cleared a hurdle for Reynolds on Thursday in a trademark and false advertising case against Handi-Foil, a competitor that wants to eat away at Reynolds' profits from its ubiquitous Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil.

Shareholders Tout Discovery Win in Fannie/Freddie Takeover Challenge

By Julie Triedman |

Lawyers for the plaintiffs say the ruling may bring them closer to brokering a deal for preferred shareholders who lost billions in expected profits when the terms of the government's Fannie and Freddie takeover suddenly changed in mid-2012.

Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong Beats Supplement Buyers' False Ad Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

Armstrong's doping confession made for great television, but it hasn't provided much fodder for false advertising class actions. Lawyers at Katten Muchin Rosenman and Greenberg Traurig defeated the latest suit this week, persuading a judge to toss claims by purchasers of sports supplements that Armstrong endorsed.

Thomas Goldstein of Goldstein & Russell

Chadbourne, Proskauer Lose Supreme Court Bid to Block Stanford Class Actions

By Julie Triedman |

In a highly anticipated decision interpreting the reach of the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act, the court green-lighted investor claims against Chadbourne & Parke, Proskauer Rose and other advisers of convicted Ponzi schemer R. Allen Stanford.

Apple Digs in for Appeal, Damages Fight in E-Books Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Apple's lawyers at Gibson Dunn are trying to make the best of the cards they've been dealt by a New York federal judge in litigation over e-books price-fixing.

Rudy Telscher

Supreme Court Newcomers Take On Fee-Shifting in Patent Cases

By Lisa Shuchman |

Don Dunner isn't the only lawyer making his U.S. Supreme Court debut this week as the justices take up the question of fee shifting in patent cases. Rudy Telscher of the IP boutique Harness Dickey & Pierce will also stand before the high court for the first time on Wednesday, arguing a case with potentially huge ramifications for the patent bar.

Microsoft Beats Sanction Ahead of Web Patent Trial

By Jan Wolfe |

Two weeks before trial in a case alleging that Microsoft infringes a patent for Web browsing, Fish & Richardson won a ruling that nixes adverse inference findings against the company.

Law Firms Back Narrow Right of Court Access in Delaware Appeal

By Ross Todd |

Two dozen major law firms came together on Monday to send an unlikely message to the U.S. Supreme Court: It's time to clamp down on open access to government.

Covington Scores for Salix in Pharma Contracts Trial

By Jan Wolfe |

Napo Pharmaceuticals claimed that Salix never delivered on a promise to promote a potentially lucrative Napo drug, but a state court jury in Manhattan told Napo to pin the blame elsewhere.

Samuel Issacharoff

Supreme Court Takes a Pass on Whirlpool Class Actions

By Jan Wolfe |

Defying expectations and the hopes of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the high court declined Monday to hear arguments that it should dismantle two class actions over allegedly defective Whirlpool Corp. washing machines.

Fourth Circuit Rejects FCA Case Against Omnicare

By Susan Beck |

The court held that even if the government paid for tainted drugs packaged by Omnicare, the company didn't violate the False Claims Act because the FDA had approved the unadulterated form of the drugs. The ruling is a win for Reed Smith.

It's Game, Set, Match for Comcast in Tennis Channel Fight

By Ross Todd |

With the Supreme Court declining to intervene, Gibson Dunn's Miguel Estrada cemented last year's victory for Comcast in a case that was widely viewed as a check on the Federal Communications Commission's power to regulate the cable industry.

Latham, Chadbourne Win Dismissal of YPF Shareholder Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

A federal judge dismissed a class action claiming that oil companies Repsol SA and YPF SA misled shareholders about the possibility of YPF being nationalized by the Argentine government.

Court Revives Patent Fight Over Manhole Cover Sealant

By Jan Wolfe |

The relatively unknown world of manhole cover sealants drew the likes of Jones Day, which represented Stopaq in its bid to revive a patent infringement claim against Amcorr, advised by Winston & Strawn.

Aereo antenna array

Aereo Scrambles After First Copyright Loss to Broadcasters

By Ross Todd |

Television's old guard finally opened a chink in Aereo Inc.'s armor this week, winning a ruling that left the Internet TV upstart and its lawyers fighting to limit the damage ahead of arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court in April.

Joel Laitman

RBS Settlement Caps Long Slog for Cohen Milstein

By Julie Triedman |

When Royal Bank of Scotland agreed to pay a class of mortgage-backed securities investors $275 million, Cohen Milstein called the deal the third- largest class action settlement in a federal mortgage-backed securities case. For partner Joel Laitman, it's been a long time coming.

Judge Won't Delay Final Approval of $8.5 Billion BofA Deal

By Jan Wolfe |

A judge in Manhattan told AIG and other objectors to Bank of America's mortgage-backed securities mega-settlement to bring their beef with the deal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Second Circuit Sides With Citi in $4 Billion Abu Dhabi Case

By Ross Todd |

Lawyers at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan struck out Wednesday in their latest attempt to revive a $4 billion arbitration claim against Citigroup on behalf of Abu Dhabi's sovereign wealth fund.

Hotels, Travel Sites Beat Price-Fixing Class Action

By Jan Wolfe |

A federal judge on Tuesday dismissed a class action lawsuit alleging that hotel chains and online travel companies conspired to fix the price of rooms booked online, handing a big win to a brigade of defense firms.

Garrard Beeney

S&C Knocks Out $500 Million Fraud Suit Against Philips

By Jan Wolfe |

A 91-year-old Italian mogul's $500 million fraud case against Philips spanned seven years and implicated the laws of at least four nations. Now, thanks to Sullivan & Cromwell and a Delaware judge, the case may finally be kaput.

Paul Weiss Strikes Out for Contorinis, Scores for Citi at Second Circuit

By Jan Wolfe |

The firm couldn't reverse a ruling that a client convicted of insider trading must disgorge $7 million. But it did finish off a fraud case brought against longtime client Citigroup Inc. by a group of Norwegian investors represented by Kasowitz Benson Torres & Friedman.

Oracle, Redwood Shores, Calif.

Boies, Bingham Clear Hurdle for Oracle in Rimini Street Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

Boies, Schiller & Flexner and Bingham McCutchen scored a partial win in Oracle's copyright battle with Rimini Street, a smaller rival that offers low-cost support to Oracle customers.

Anadarko Tank facility, Uinta Basin, Utah.

Kirkland Seeks $20.7 Billion in Damages From Anadarko

By Julie Triedman |

There's a $20 billion gulf between what Anadarko and its adversaries think the company should have to pay to resolve a battle over environmental liabilities in the Tronox Inc. bankruptcy.

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Fends Off Investor Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. and its lawyers at Alston & Bird have defeated claims that the company misled investors about the results of a clinical trial for its cancer drug Perifosine.

Bridgestone tire

DOJ Warns 'Repeat Offenders' with $425 Million Bridgestone Fine

By Ross Todd |

The Justice Department has a message for companies in trouble for fixing prices: If you're going to come clean, you better not hold back.

Indiana Court Finds IBM Botched $1.3 Billion State Contract

By Jan Wolfe |

An appeals court ruled that IBM botched an assignment to privatize Indiana's welfare benefits system, putting the computing giant on the hook for as much as $177 million in damages. The decision is a major reversal of fortune for the state and its lawyers at Barnes & Thornburg, who were up against high-powered opponents at Kirkland & Ellis.

Cadwalader Faces Narrowed Malpractice Claim Over Nomura Advice

By Jan Wolfe |

With a long-awaited trial on the horizon, Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft persuaded an appeals court to trim a $70 million malpractice suit brought by former client Nomura Asset Capital Corp., a sponsor of mortgage-backed securities.

The Courts, Not DOJ, Should Decide If JPMorgan Deal Is Fair

By Susan Beck |

Better Markets' lawsuit challenging the Justice Department's $13 billion deal with JPMorgan is probably doomed to fail. But that doesn't mean the Wall Street watchdog is wrong to blast the DOJ for bypassing judicial scrutiny in its record out-of-court settlement.

George Canellos

SEC's Canellos Returns to Milbank as Shearman Picks Up Orrick Heavyweights

By Julie Triedman |

Wednesday was a day of musical chairs for the New York securities bar. One top securities litigator and government enforcer opted to return to his longtime law firm, while another prominent practitioner landed at his fourth firm in eight years.

Keurig coffee machine

Winston's Webb Wades Into Coffee Pod Wars

By Jan Wolfe |

Single-serve coffee brewers are big business, especially now that market leader Green Mountain's patents on the technology have expired. So it's fitting that an upstart competitor has hired big-name litigator Dan Webb to challenge Green Mountain's recent efforts to maintain its huge market share.

Google Faces Damages Retrial in SimpleAir Patent Case

By Ross Todd |

Google and its lawyers at Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton wanted a do-over in their patent fight with SimpleAir. Instead, a judge signed off on a jury's infringement verdict against Google and gave SimpleAir a second chance to win more than $125 million in a damages retrial.

Citing Ninth Circuit Ruling, Nevada Drops Fight Over Gay Marriage Ban

By Ross Todd |

We named Lisa Blatt of Arnold & Porter and Brian Hennigan of Irell & Manella Litigators of the Week for last month's Ninth Circuit win, in which the court found that lawyers for Abbott Labs improperly struck a self-identified gay juror because of his sexual orientation.

Michael Bromwich

Court Nixes Bid to Stay E-Books Monitor as Apple Presses Appeal

By Jan Wolfe |

Apple lost its bid to stop court-appointed e-books monitor Michael Bromwich in his tracks, at least for now. But Apple's lawyers at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher nevertheless succeeded in curtailing Bromwich's authority as they continue fighting the government's antitrust case.

Wall Street Watchdog Sues DOJ over $13B JPMorgan Pact

By Jan Wolfe |

Better Markets Inc., a nonprofit led by a former partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, filed an unusual lawsuit Monday challenging the legality of the U.S. Department of Justice's $13 billion mortgage settlement with J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.

Judge Rebukes MoFo Over Apple v. Samsung Closing

By Lisa Shuchman |

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh delivered a stern rebuke to Apple's lawyers for seemingly appealing to nationalism and xenophobia at the company's damages retrial against Korean rival Samsung.

perfume bottles

Perfumer Dodges Flavor Behemoth's $80M Trade Secrets Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

After a long and hard-fought jury trial, a team from McCarter & English persuaded a jury to reject an $80 million trade secrets case that the fragrance and flavor giant Givaudan SA brought against a prominent perfumer and his new company.

HTC Agrees to Pay License for Nokia Patents

By Jan Wolfe |

On the eve of an expected ruling from the U.S. International Trade Commission, HTC Corp. and its lawyers at McDermott Will & Emery decided to play it safe and settle a patent infringement case brought by Nokia Oyj, which was being advised by Alston & Bird and Desmarais.

Q&A With Preet Bharara, Manhattan U.S. Attorney

By Julie Triedman |

Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara has had his share of big weeks since taking office nearly five years ago. But even for him, the last one was a doozy.

Mathew Martoma exits federal court with his wife Rosemary Martoma and attorneys Richard Strassberg and Roberto Braceras in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014.

Jury Finds SAC's Martoma Guilty as Bharara Extends Streak

By Ross Todd |

Despite the efforts of defense lawyer Richard Strassberg of Goodwin Procter, Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara claimed yet another victory on Thursday in his campaign to clamp down on insider trading.

BNY Mellon Dodges Repsol's $50 Million Suit

By Jan Wolfe |

A judge has tossed Spanish oil company Repsol's claims that YPF SA and Bank of New York Mellon wrongfully blocked it from casting votes at a YPF shareholder meeting. On the losing end of the ruling were Repsol's attorneys at Butzel Long. Dechert represented BNYMellon while Chadbourne & Parke advised YPF.

Jury Deadlocks in Intellectual Ventures Trial Debut

By Jan Wolfe |

A Delaware patent infringement trial pitting Intellectual Ventures against Motorola Mobility Inc. was billed as a referendum on the patent monetization business. So much for that.

White & Case Scores for Pfizer in Lyrica Patent Row

By Ross Todd |

Pfizer Inc. and its lawyers at White & Case fended off a major challenge from generic rivals on Thursday, persuading an appeals court that patents for the blockbuster painkiller Lyrica give the company exclusive rights to sell the drug through the end of 2018.

AIG Wins Temporary Delay of $8.5 Billion BofA Deal

By Jan Wolfe |

With so many zeroes at stake in Bank of America's megasettlement with mortgage-backed securities investors, some high-profile challengers aren't ready to declare an end to the case just yet.

More Banks May Face FCA Charges From Mortgage Crisis

By Julie Triedman |

JPMorgan's $614 million False Claims Act settlement with the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan indicates that major banks have a ways to go to shake off FCA liability stemming from the mortgage crisis.

SEC Suffers Latest Trial Setback in Life Partners Case

By Jan Wolfe |

Both sides are claiming victory after a mixed verdict in the Securities and Exchange Commission's fraud case against the Texan financial services firm Life Partners Holdings Inc. Can Patton Boggs and Baker & McKenzie persuade the judge to make it a clean defense win?

Banks' Bill in FHFA Cases: $9 Billion and Counting

By Jan Wolfe |

The latest blockbuster settlement was announced late Tuesday, when Morgan Stanley revealed it would pay $1.25 billion for selling faulty mortgage-backed securities to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Skadden Fends Off Southwest Airlines Merger Challenge

By Jan Wolfe |

The Ninth Circuit brought a likely end to an antitrust class action seeking to undo Southwest Airlines Co.'s 2011 acquisition of AirTran Airways Inc.

Bingham Beats Abu Dhabi Bank's Fraud Case Against Credit Suisse

By Ross Todd |

Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank struck out for the second time Tuesday in its bid to revive a lawsuit against Credit Suisse Group AG over a troubled $40 million structured finance transaction.

PwC Must Face Trial Over SemGroup Collapse

By Ross Todd |

Siding with lawyers at Quinn Emanuel, a judge in Tulsa ruled that PricewaterhouseCoopers can't escape billion-dollar claims that it paved the way for the collapse of energy transport giant SemGroup.

It's Chu v. Apple in Wisconsin University Patent Case

By Lisa Shuchman |

In a new lawsuit, the Irell & Manella partner alleges that Apple incorporated university technology in the processor that powers the company's newest blockbuster devices: the iPhone 5S, iPad Air and iPad Mini with Retina Display.

Aereo antenna array

Aereo Rival to Supreme Court: What About Us?

By Jan Wolfe |

The TV streaming start-ups Aereo Inc. and FilmOn have a lot in common, including the tiny antennas they use to transmit programming to subscribers. But when it comes to their record in the courts, FilmOn and its lawyers have some catching up to do.

Kathy Patrick of Gibbs & Bruns.

Judge Gives Green Light to BofA Mortgage Settlement

By Jan Wolfe |

A judge in New York largely approved a long-delayed $8.5 billion settlement between Bank of America and mortgage-backed securities investors, resolving in one fell swoop much of the bank's liability for its acquisition of Countrywide Financial Corp.

Am Law Firms Beat Back Class Cert Bid in Pharma Case

By Ross Todd |

Siding with lawyers at Kaye Scholer and Munger Tolles, a federal judge declined to certify two classes in an antitrust case accusing a Pfizer subsidiary of conspiring to block cheaper generic versions of its Skelaxin muscle relaxant from reaching the market.

Eric Lewis

Goldman Sachs Can't Escape CDO Fraud Case

By Jan Wolfe |

A New York appeals court has allowed a defunct Australian hedge fund, Basis Yield Alpha Fund, to proceed with a $1 billion fraud case against Goldman Sachs & Co. The ruling is a win for the small litigation boutique Lewis Baach, and a setback for Goldman's lawyers at Boies Schiller.

Gibson Dunn Lands One-Two Punch in SAIC Investor Cases

By Jan Wolfe |

On the same day, Gibson Dunn's Andrew Tulumello helped SAIC win two major rulings in lingering investor litigation related to a New York City kickbacks scandal.

Judge Rejects Fee Bid in $20 Billion Sprint M&A Challenge

By Ross Todd |

A gaggle of top plaintiffs firms that challenged a $20 billion deal involving Sprint got some disappointing news this week when a Kansas judge denied their bid for $8 million in fees.

Maurice

Debevoise Knocks Out Greenberg Suit Over AIG Bailout

By Jan Wolfe |

Maurice "Hank" Greenberg, the former chairman of American International Group, has reached a dead end in his company's $25 billion lawsuit alleging that the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's takeover of AIG was unlawful.

Vringo Patent Ruling May Cost Google Plenty

By Jan Wolfe |

In dribs and drabs, the 2012 patent infringement verdict that Vringo Inc. and its lawyers at Dickstein Shapiro won against Google has ballooned into one of the largest in years.

Stephen Glass

Free Stephen Glass!

By Susan Beck |

Bar associations should stop trying to judge moral character, and focus on punishing lawyers who actually harm their clients and the courts.

At (Long) Last, a Supreme Court Debut

By Lisa Shuchman |

At 82, the revered IP litigator and appellate specialist Donald Dunner of Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner has never argued a case before the U.S. Supreme Court. But, as Dunner says, "there's a first time for everything."

William Lee of WilmerHale

Finance, Media Defendants Beat RealTime Patent Suits

By Jan Wolfe |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has brought a near-certain end to RealTime Data's patent infringement campaign against a large swath of the financial services industry.

Goldman Loses Bid to Arbitrate Case Tied to Credit Union Collapse

By Jan Wolfe |

Faced with claims that Goldman Sachs saddled a failed credit union with toxic securities, Goldman's lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell unearthed a long forgotten arbitration agreement that they hoped would offer a quick escape.

Securities Filings Rise as Halliburton Challenge Looms

By Ross Todd |

You know something big is brewing in investor litigation when every study on last year's uptick in securities class action filings includes the caveat that the practice could come to a screeching halt in 2014.

SAC's Cohen Must Face Ex-Wife's Fraud Claims

By Ross Todd |

"Though treble damages are a tempting way to spice things up, civil RICO and marriage do not go together like a horse and carriage," a federal judge ruled in Patricia Cohen v. Steven Cohen.

Charles

MoFo Nabs Top FCPA Prosecutor Charles Duross

By Ross Todd |

After testing the waters at about a half-dozen law firms, the Justice Department's outgoing FCPA enforcer is joining Morrison & Foerster to lead the firm's global anticorruption practice.